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Religion & Theology (& should we respect beliefs)


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Ok, I think this is a touchy topic, and I don't want to have the board at each others necks over this issue, but I'd just like to know.

 

Do you follow a religion? If so what one?

 

Personally I don't believe in 'god' as such or christianity. I do however believe that there has to be a higher power of some sort because if not, the world is really an amazing accident.

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I have to say - and it's not directly related to religion & theology - but it is sort of a...cousin is, something that REALLY gets on my wick is this garbage industry spawned in this "New Age" to

Do you follow a religion? If so what one?

 

This is a huge subject Jimmy. But as they say the greatest of journeys begins with one small step. I think Gautama Buddha said that, appropriately enough.

 

Any way to answer the above question, it is, of course, possible and increasingly common to have a system of beliefs in a 'bigger picture' that do not follow any particular formalized religion. The whole issue has become so relevant that even top line physicists are venturing out of their chosen fields to investigate the "paranormal" because there are so many 'unlikely' things in the world and the universe that attempting to explain them defies logic as currently understood in the general laws of physics.

 

The 'god' aspect of this may be called gnosticism in a sense.

 

ie. Many people like yourself, me included, have an intuitive 'belief' or experience that there's more going on than flesh bone, plants and rocks, but attempts to quantify it are no more successful than the latest metaphysical attempts to prove the existence of 'dark energy', to acccompany dark matter, in the universe.

 

Bet you're sorry you asked now.... :P

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I have no problem with anyone supporting their own religion providing they don't push it upon others. It should be looked upon the same as drugs, smoking and anything other addictive. People should be free to make their own choices in life. If someone believes that a religious life is for them, then they have plenty of outlets to gather information on the best path to take.

 

At the end of the day when a war starts somewhere in the world it is undeniably tied back down to either religion or politics, usually a combination of the two. All because one or the other is trying to push something on the other party that they don't want. Leave folk to their own devices and things might not end up so bloody.

 

Wasn't that long ago that I had to ask a couple of Mormons to shift their car off of my garden, which they promptly did, only to follow it up by going and knocking on my garage door...are they that desperate?

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I do however believe that there has to be a higher power of some sort because if not, the world is really an amazing accident.

 

I'm firmly agnostic so I'm not going to give a straight yes or no answer.

 

But I think the world being an amazing accident is as likely a version of events as any of the religious stories.

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But I think the world being an amazing accident is as likely a version of events as any of the religious stories.

 

 

This is true.

 

In Steven Hawking book 'A brief history of time', his conclusion was a surprise, he says maybe God did it. This is coming from the most intellegent man on the planet...that has gotta say something?

 

Like you though, I ususally need to see things to believe them.

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"The most intelligent man on the planet" is an accolade I'm sure even Mr Hawking might argue with. There are physicists doing much more important work, they just don't have the public profile that Hawking does.

 

As for the conclusion he comes to in his book (and I'm taking your word for it, I've never read it), the important word there is "maybe". In other words, he doesn't know.

 

I suspect he's got the same built-in inability to seriously contemplate the impermanent nature of his own existance that most of us have.

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"Love your enemy" is what Jesus said. Buddha says the same thing.

 

Love your enemies. Not only should you love your own parents, your family, your friends, but you should love your enemies. Because if you don't love your enemies, how can you help them change? If you hate your enemies, you just reinforce the hatred, you will be fighting hatred with hatred, and you will never be able to change them. The vicious cycle will never end. What happens when your brother makes a mistake? You teach him patiently because he's your brother. That's why you should love your enemies. It's only when you love your enemies that you can hope to change them.

 

One has a "God", the other does not.

 

Two rivers flowing in parallel, but that does not make either one stronger than the other, it is only where they join that strength is found.

 

A wise prophet can influence all, through knowledge, without the use of faith.

 

A prophet with faith can impart wisdom to all without providing knowledge.

 

Just some brain fodder :wink:

 

It's just a pity that it's impossible to find the same sentiment in Islam, Maybe that's what gives the christian fundamentalist yanks the fervour to invade. Ironic indeed.

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Thanks Njugle, yun wis a braally good post.

 

There certainly is a lot of beautiful things taught in both Buddhism and Christianity about how we treat people who disagree wi us.

 

The thing is, it's not always easy. We might know, and agree wi the sentiment about loving all people. But in daily life, all sorts o things happen that can find us acting differently.

 

Wir no perfect either, and sometimes we dunna love wi that perfect love even tho it's what we aspire to. Thankfully Christ also taught that we are imperfect. We cannot attain the moral perfection he taught by ourselves. The Christian way is about accepting His forgiveness when we get it wrong.

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The Christian way is about accepting His forgiveness when we get it wrong.

 

Not putting anything or anyone down, though this may come across as that, but this sentiment is what potentially makes a mockery of the faith. An easy loophole to give people 'peace of mind'!

 

*Just trying to stir debate*

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