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Charity Giving - Children or Animals?


Who would you make a £5 charity donation to?  

28 members have voted

  1. 1. Who would you make a £5 charity donation to?

    • Children's Charity
      13
    • Animal Charity
      6
    • I'm one of thse people who can't conform to 1 of 2 choices!
      10


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I only give to things which will help people in the UK, anything else can go whistle.

 

Why is a blind man in Birmingham more deserving of your money than a blind man in Botswana ?

 

I would argue that the opposite is true. A blind man in Birmingham has our NHS and welfare system to help him. A blind man in Botswana is probably reduced to begging.

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Someone passed me details of this website which might be worth a look for those of you who do a bit of shopping online.

 

www.retail-charity.com

 

The explanatory blurb is all on the homepage but basically they have an agreement with various companies i.e. Amazon, W H Smith, etc. that if you come to their website and shop via the Retail Charity one then they will donate some dosh to the charity type of your choice i.e. animal, children's, environmental, medical, etc.

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Would be a kids charity for me. Whilst I agree that having to rely on charity to ensure the safety and good health of children in this country is ridiculous it is nonetheless a fact.

I quite like animals, have 2 cats plus 2 adopted stray cats myself and I wouldn't see harm come to any of them. However, I can't justify the existance of an animal over the existance of a child so that's where my loyalties would lie.

 

As far as where the money went, well I used to think that we should look after children (people) in our own country before others but now I'm more of the mind that charity is charity and as long as it goes to some good and is used productively then it doesn't really matter where.

 

Strangly enough, the better half and I were discussing charity and the lottery last night. If everyone who buys a ticket donated that money to charity each week then think of how much good would be done.

All without the side-effects of lining a fat-cat consortiums pockets, producing undeserving millionaires who don't have a clue what to do with all that money, ludicrous amounts of money being wasted on PC organisations set up for non-existant minorities and (most importantly) forcing some god-awful 'big lottery' show on to our TV screens.

Of course, there would be no incentive for people to part with that quid then would there?

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I heard, and cannot support with evidence so this is probably meaningless, that charities have suffered due to the lottery. People think they're doing their bit by buying a ticket, but aren't contributing as much overall.

 

Could just be rumour, but seems plausible.

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I heard, and cannot support with evidence so this is probably meaningless, that charities have suffered due to the lottery. People think they're doing their bit by buying a ticket, but aren't contributing as much overall.

 

Could just be rumour, but seems plausible.

 

I just can't see this, unless of course you divide charities and good causes. By good causes I refer to play parks for kids and minibuses for whatever group. I think there is more money floating around that is going to charities in the wake of the lottery.

 

From 16 to 26 I averaged about £20 a year to charity. This was a compulsory donation of a day's pay to my regiment's charity and a compulsory donation to the poppy appeal.

 

I managed to whittle that down to a pound or two a year and then only if the charity collector was gorgeous! I was happy to help charities but didn't feel that I had the money to support them especially as those working for charitable organisations were mostly on a much better wage than I was.

 

My contribution to charity now extends to £4 a week on the lottery, plus odds and sods to local (worthwhile) charities through the supermarket chuggers. Indirect charity by giving and buying from charity shops.

 

I happily accept that the Lottery is a tax on stupidity, but my savings from no longer smoking, another well taxed supidity, allow me room for a little stupidity.

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Why is a blind man in Birmingham more deserving of your money than a blind man in Botswana ?

 

He shouldn't, although it's well documented that people in general are far more inclined to "care" about the well-being of those closer to their own culture/country/ethnicity.

 

An uncomfortable fact for many, but one need only look at the coverage afforded the death of, for example, school children in an American shooting Vs the slaughter of an entire African village to see where "our" main concern would lie.

 

A mining accident in India (of which there are many a year) recently claimed 100s of lives, yet barely made the 6 O'clock news. A similar event in our country would be news-flash worthy.

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I make no apoligise I only give money to things that will help people in the UK. I especially give money to cancer research or heart disease as that has effected people I have known and may for all I know be benifical to myself or my loved ones in the future so not really charity but an investment.

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Why is a blind man in Birmingham more deserving of your money than a blind man in Botswana ?

 

He shouldn't, although it's well documented that people in general are far more inclined to "care" about the well-being of those closer to their own culture/country/ethnicity.

 

An uncomfortable fact for many, but one need only look at the coverage afforded the death of, for example, school children in an American shooting Vs the slaughter of an entire African village to see where "our" main concern would lie.

 

A mining accident in India (of which there are many a year) recently claimed 100s of lives, yet barely made the 6 O'clock news. A similar event in our country would be news-flash worthy.

 

See also the disproportionate coverage given to the deaths of US and UK soldiers, compared to deaths of civilians, in Iraq.

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I make no apoligise I only give money to things that will help people in the UK. I especially give money to cancer research or heart disease as that has effected people I have known and may for all I know be benifical to myself or my loved ones in the future so not really charity but an investment.

 

Cancer and heart disease aren't specifically British conditions, and any improvements in treatment benefit people worldwide, no matter where they are developed. Would you consider donating to, say, an American cancer research charity, if you thought doing so would be more likely to benefit yourself or your loved ones in the future ?

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Probally not if I knew there were charities here I could give to.

So you would rather give your money to an inefficient UK cancer research charity that would be less likely to come up with a cure for a disease you might one day suffer from, than an efficient foreign cancer research charity.

 

( The above is just a hypothetical example - I've no idea about the relative merits of UK and foreign cancer research charities. )

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