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Shetland's property boom


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I'm very glad to hear that. :)

 

Apologies if I seemed to be having a go at you. Wasn't trying to, but it struck me that the language you were using was very much of the kind I hear from several people I know who consider it acceptable to hold onto as many houses as they can and charge extortionate rents to families (including, in one case, their own!); the folks who could really do with buying their own place are left out in the cold (sometimes literally) while huge numbers of houses stand empty for 75% of the year because it's all rented, or simply being held as an 'asset'.

 

These crooks use words like 'investment' and 'portfolio' as if this somehow legitimised it all.

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I am interested to read of the Shetland Property 'boom'.

 

Although I live in Shropshire; my mum is from Shetland - and so were all my ancestors dating back to pre 1600 and presumably before that. Not surprisingly, I am very keen on Shetland and would love to own a property there.

 

I've looked into buying land (without planning permission) but in 'Zone 2' areas " - "where housing development will be favourably considered". . However, whenever I contact any official body, be it the Council or whoever; as soon as they hear my non-Shetland accent, they become very reticent and unhelpful. Basically, they don't want to know. It isn't as easy as others may imagine for 'soothmoothers' to get land in Shetland. Call it positive discrimination if you like. In other words; if I did buy Zone 2 land, I bet my chances of getting planning permission would be far lower than that of a local.

 

 

This means that individuals selling such land (in Zone 2 without planning permission), are far more likely to sell it to native Shetlanders (nothing wrong with that of course), but they would probably get a better price if the market wasn't just for locals - if just because more people may be interested.

 

From the perspective of a 'soothmoother', if I did manage to find some land, I'd still have a great deal to do. I'd have to employ local builders and tradesmen - surely this would only help the local economy ?

 

I'd much prefer to buy land than a house, largely 'cos land (in the main) is cheaper. We don't all have barrowloads of money. In fact, I'm trying to find land with my brother and sister - collectively, we might be able to afford it. Anyone know of any land for sale on which we would be able to buy a house???

 

Not all of us 'soothmoothers' are out to try and profit at the expense of the locals. In fact, I'd say that in some instances, 'soothmoothers' are my likely to be exploited. I bet Shetland builders are making a very good living.

 

Anyone know of any land for sale (In the region of Burra, Trondra, Scalloway) on which we would be able to buy a house???

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Anyone know of any land for sale (In the region of Burra, Trondra, Scalloway) on which we would be able to buy a house???

 

House sites in Scalloway are very hard to come by. In the village itself there is virtually nothing. At the East Voe DITT and JHB seem to have grabbed anything that's available. The only land I know on the market is halfway up the Scord. Maurice Anderson got planning permission for 3 sites ( http://www.shetland.gov.uk/coins/commpdfs/Public/8470.pdf). These are partially serviced and were in the paper a few weeks ago with no takers. They were probably too dear, plus they are right next to the main road and just across the road from the Scord quarry.

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Thank you for your reply Muckle Joannie !

 

I know of the site and indeed my sister visited it yesterday, but we've discounted it, because of the location.

 

My family are from Scalloway (My Grandfather was born at Westshore {He was a Laurenson} - opposite the College and various relations lived in Scalloway - If you have lived in Scalloway for a while, you may have known of Arthur Mouatt who died about 6 years ago; he lived at Houll). My Grandmother also lived in Scalloway for a while, though her family was from North Roe.

 

Thank you again for taking the trouble to reply !

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I've looked into buying land (without planning permission) but in 'Zone 2' areas " - "where housing development will be favourably considered". . However, whenever I contact any official body, be it the Council or whoever; as soon as they hear my non-Shetland accent, they become very reticent and unhelpful. Basically, they don't want to know. It isn't as easy as others may imagine for 'soothmoothers' to get land in Shetland. Call it positive discrimination if you like. In other words; if I did buy Zone 2 land, I bet my chances of getting planning permission would be far lower than that of a local.

 

 

This means that individuals selling such land (in Zone 2 without planning permission), are far more likely to sell it to native Shetlanders (nothing wrong with that of course), but they would probably get a better price if the market wasn't just for locals - if just because more people may be interested.

 

Please don't feel as though I am 'having an go' at you as it's not my intention but your post iritated me.

 

Automatically deciding that you have been treated unfairly in some way or not given the same level of service as a Shetlander because of you accent, is quite frankly a down right stoooopid assumption and if it is a display of your attitude, you will probably encounter hostility (because of the attitude not the accent). I too have tried to speak to the planning department about getting planning permission and let me tell you this, they are equally unhelpful to everybody! I found getting any sense out of them very difficult.

 

The planning department is notoriously busy and overwork/undermanned (whatever is more appropriate), cut them some slack.

 

And as for land sellers being more likely to sell to native Shetlanders - rubbish. Why would they care whether or not you have can better or worse chance of getting planning permission?

 

Anyway, good luck with your land hunting and don't automatically jump to the conclusion that you are being discriminated against - poor service is wide spread , regardless of accent.

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I've many Shetland relations and friends and they'd be pleased to tell anyone that my attitude is that of an extremely easy-going person - I've lived in a pub for 25 years, so I'm particularly used to dealing with people from ALL walks of life. I'm very easy-going with people from Shetland, since I like the people and the place VERY much !!!

 

I didn't actually state that land sellers would be more likely to sell to native Shetlanders; I stated that land sellers are more likely to sell land without planning permission to native Shetlanders. There's a difference. I don't mean that they are deliberately intending to sell land to others from Shetland; I'm just saying that they are more likely to do so because of certain factors.

 

Obtaining planning permission is not something that can be done merely through telephone calls and letters. There is quite a degree of risk involved; someone from the South is going to be reluctant to buy any land without planning, because if they lose the gamble, they are left with a piece land many hundreds of miles away. If a local doesn't get planning permission, they will find it easy to arrange other options for the land. Someone from England (or Scotland/Wales) would be reluctant to undergo the process of obtaining planning permission, since it would necessitate (costly) trips up to Shetland, possibly at unsuitable times of the year. A return trip to Shetland costs me around £400. Fortunately, I've many relations with whom I can stay.

 

Far easier then (if it is affordable) to buy land which has already obtained planning permission.

 

I've always had excellent service in Shetland, apart from the 'official' bodies. I'm surprised however, that you consider them to be 'overworked'; I thought that the council was one of the largest employers in Shetland ?

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^^^

 

Yip, they are more valid problems. I guess buying land when you are south is always going to be a gamble. I would suggest that moving up here into rented accomodation in the mean time would be an easier way to 'oversee' a planning application, but that isn't a cheap thing to do and also I would warn you that there is a big demand for builders up here at the moment. So, even after getting permission, it could take a while for the building be complete.

 

Your correct in saying that the council is one of the biggest employers but as far as the planning dept is concerned (as anybody that's tried to get permission recently will tell you) it's gotten very difficult to get an application through all the new regs and red tape. There certainly was a large back log of applications, I don't know how long it typically takes from start to finish at the moment but I bet it's not quick and I'm sure the fine peoples in the planning dept are doing their best.

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I can't say I've been involved in buying and selling too many house sites, but I had the impression that sites were often "sold" with an agreement that it was conditional on being granted planning permission - no permission = contract is not completed.

 

Now of course depending which site you wanted and how much interest there was in it it might be harder to get that kind of a deal.

 

Regarding planing permission again my outside impression is that it is not so bad..... compared with the building control process...... ;-)

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I know of the site and indeed my sister visited it yesterday, but we've discounted it, because of the location.

 

Yes you'd have had me for a neighbour!

 

I don't know if you're aware that the long term plan is for the Scord to excavate the south end of the quarry. That bit will be closed and the main road rerouted through the disused part with the current main road becoming for access only. The marks where the topsoil removed on the Lerwick side of the quarry was the investigation of the feasibity of extending the quarry.

 

you may have known of Arthur Mouatt

 

I remember him. He used to come to the 500 at the Boating Club when I was on the committee there

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^^^

 

Watch oot!

 

I heard yestertday from a friend of a friend who heard from his 13th cousin's wife's hairdresser's neighbour (who is a real estate agent btw), that houses aren't selling like they were. Sure, they are all still selling, but not for the silly percentages over the valuation that they were. Offers of the valuation price are becoming more the norm.

 

The next step after that is for the valuations to go down...

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