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Cephalids (particularly tortoises)


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Does anyone, or do you know anyone, in Shetland that has a tortoise?

 

Can you shed any light on the caring and things that "never get told" about tortoises i.e. the little snippets about them such as to keep them happy in a comparitive environment and or little things that only an "owner" would know.

 

Thanks for any advice.

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Trout, I had a Greec land turtle (testuda graeca) for years, so I can speak for those only.

 

Firstly ... any bred from the graeca would like to enjoy a sunny day out in a Shetland garden.

But than you have to watch them closely. They become sportive and are quicker than you might have thought. :wink:

Fencing them in doesn't really help. They are clever beasts and start to dig under the fence ... and they are phantastic diggers! :wink:

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Thanks islandhopper :D

 

I'm very much at the looking lots into it stage. Tortoises I've always found fascinating and the fact that it's an animal that can outlive you by a long shot makes them quite endearing I think.

 

Being a Mediterranean native animal I'm positive that I'll need to have quite a large enclosure indoors for the majority of the year. Some form of terranium setup with additional UV lighting.

 

However, having always been of the impression that animals housed in tanks are the best pets to keep - i.e. fish (of which I have several 6 - 7 year old "muckle" goldfish pootering about) I'm reticent about an animal that will, to a certain degree, have free range to wander about - especially since it can't be house trained!

 

*ponders*

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Being a Mediterranean native animal I'm positive that I'll need to have quite a large enclosure indoors for the majority of the year. Some form of terranium setup with additional UV lighting.

Trout, I'm not sure about the temperature. I only know that some of the beasts do live in the hills and above 800m - and on those levels the Greec hills can be pritty cold.

A dry space might be prefered first of anything else.

 

And some kinds demand a nice winter rest. My good old lassie Penelope - now well in her 60s and still living with my niece - goes to her winterbed for the very last by mid november. Then she is put into a wooden box, some straw underneath and a heap of hay on top and a little flat pot with water in one corner and then she goes down into the cellar ... In case she wakes up and gets hungry she nipples some hay and sipp a little water (keep it always fresh) and then she turns for the next round of sleep ... ;-) ... sleeps normally until the first warm sunshine in March.

 

But real behaviour is depending on the specia and - nowadays - how they are brought up by the breeder. Modern commercially bred animals are said to do well being up all year round, but you must ask the breeder about that because only he will know about the condition of the individual.

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