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Fish Farming & Aquaculture


peeriebryan
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this is going to end in tears.....

 

i`m confused about the organic status...are there two sets of standards?

 

How can we trust "organic" labeling if a production system fails one set ie the soil association,and yet gains its status elsewhere?

 

As for the money put in.....we need to start a book on its collapse date...or am i being too cynical?

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Guest Anonymous

I believe they use real fish scraps such as the broken waste fish from shetland catch , there is also a lot of research going into developing feed that has a significant vegetable content as cod are highly opportunistic feeders.

They will frequently eat each other , they will also steadily eat the net around them as they try to munch up the weed and algae that grow on it.

Also where salmon production often has the problem of saithe entering the net to get a free meal and then of course ending up to big to get out again and so becoming an expensive burden to the farmer , this does not happen with cod as they eat the saithe .

And the farmed cod are in better condition as there wild cousins as far as worm infestation of the liver and flesh go.

Because farmed cod are kept of the seabed by the net that surrounds them they do not get exposed to worms. there wild relatives are rooting around in the seabed lik a grice for any scraps o meat they can find .

The end result is that wild cod are usually full o worms and farmed ones are nearly always completely free of worm.

The fish farming industry has been here for decades now and i think shetland would have been a far poorer place withoot it.

personally I prefer a haddock or a fresh mackeral pan fried in oatmeal , but I do eat a bit o salmon now and again and i think it is bra good as weel.

A joint o salmon baked in the oven we soy sauce is very nice......

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Just to put in my twopenith, we will see over the next few months and years more and more Shetland public money pumped into this cod farming enterprise before the public wake up and realise it will not pay.

 

The Johnsons are very good business men...do you think they would sell the cod farming enterprise if they could see it being profitable in the near future, a lot of money has been invested already in a product that only has a demand in English fish and chip shops but not at the price it costs to farm.

 

Sal

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Aah Salmon, a disgruntled employee me thinks - but not of the cod business.

The fish farming industry has had to get fit to survive with the competition and the main investors now are Norwegian. They have put their money in and lost heavily in the last few years and are now able to celebrate a bit of profit for a change. They can't win with some people can they. If 'Shetland' money had gone in and been lost the likes of you would have them hung but its OK if Norskie money is lost but, oh dear, isn't it awful when the investors make a return! The reason that fish processing businesses are looking for immigrant workers is simple. They will actually work and are generally concientious and willing, but mainly it is because there simply aren't sufficient peole suited to the job who will do it in Shetland. The wage needs to allow them to compete simple a that. That's why they are still in business - all those years without a pay rise when they were making huge losses has helped them cut the cloth to survive and they still employ hundreds of people in these islands.

The fish farming industry is a major employer OUTSIDE Lerwick and Shetland would be a poor place without it.

 

As far as cod farmng goes it seems that even canny city investors putting in £20 million still won't convince folk here that a couple of million is worth risking on top of that. THe culture in Shetland seems to be that if it ain't a dead cert don't risk it. That attitude will not get us too far.

 

We have all our Shetland public funds invested in the stock market with various fund managers taking a nice cut out of us. When the gambling on the stock market doesn't work out and Millions are lost we seem to accept it - but not if its a local business or two that happen to fail. Is that not a bit daft? These fund managers have not exactly been performing well with our money but I don't hear much about how much they have lost us over the years.

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Guest Anonymous

yes in years gone by substantial amounts of community/council money was used to prop up salmon businesses that would have gone bankrupt a lot earlier than they did if they had been operating any where else.

Is this really such a bad thing ?

The end result was that hundreds of people carried on earning a living long after the would have otherwise been made redundant.

Looking back now it was probably a good thing for the many people whose livelyhoods were protected by shetlands oil purse during a bad time for the fish farming industry which I prefer to to refer to as aqua crofting.

Now it is boom time again with salmon fetching steady high prices and most operators vastly increasing the number of fish they will grow in the next few years.

Also I am very glad to see the foriegn workers who have arrived to take part in the industry , every one I have met so far has been polite , hard working and very happy to have the chance to have a job.

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  • 5 months later...

So you go bust 3 years ago losing £7.8 million (yes million, not pence!) of public money with around £2million of debts not met by the receivers. and then you sell your new company for £3.8million.

 

How does that work then? What about the original receivers? Do they get any of the new money that only took 3 years to get?

 

Is it only me or does it smell abit fishy?

 

And why has no one dared comment on this?

 

Fx

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So you go bust 3 years ago losing £7.8 million (yes million, not pence!) of public money with around £2million of debts not met by the receivers. and then you sell your new company for £3.8million.

 

How does that work then? What about the original receivers? Do they get any of the new money that only took 3 years to get?

 

Fx

 

Under company law the new company will have no connection with the bust one so tough sh*t for the receiver.

 

It could be argued that by building a successful new company from the ashes of the old one Mr Goodlad should be congratulated. From

 

http://www.vecosys.com/2007/01/26/bankruptcy-is-just-a-battle-scar-for-american-entrepreneurs/

 

Simply put, we live in a country that encourages dreamers to take risks, and the laws protect those “entrepreneurs†from the potentially excessive consequences of failure. Bankruptcy laws enable risk-takers to protect themselves and start over. There is no other nation on this planet that by its very by-laws fosters such an economic environment. This spirit, the acceptance of failure, while counter-intuitive, is crucial to this country’s enormous success within the world economy.

 

In any bankruptcy the only losers are the banks and their shareholders. From other threads it would appear that Shetlinkers think baks make enough profits. Unfortunately in this case the shareholdres are the Shetland people.

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