Jump to content

Birds, animals and idder beasties


Recommended Posts

Can you still git Bobby Tulloch's beuk on Shaetlan birds? He haes aa da Shaetlan naems.

 

Trønder - most Shetland bird names are indeed Norn.

 

Gõs indeed means 'goose' - the form is, however, Scots rather than Norn, the 'ui' (I would spell it 'guis') being the regular Scots reflex of English 'oo'.

 

Kye is plural, the singular is Coo. Again a Scots form, although even in the strong Scots-speaking area where I live the plural form has died out, and even the 'broadest' Scots speakers say 'coos'. An example of how Shaetlan sometimes preserves (or preserved for slightly longer) Scots forms which died out earlier on Mainland Scotland.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 93
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 1 month later...
(...) shalder = oyster catcher (...)

Shalder, like Chalder, Chaldrick, Sheldor, seems to be rather similar to the faroese Tjaldur.

There is a well known faroese poem of Guðrið Helmsdal about the Tjaldur (oystercatcher), who is a "national" bird on the Faroes bringing back the spring every year (march, 12th).

__________________

 

MORGUN Ã MARS

 

Morgun

í mars

 

Hjartað:

eitt tjaldur

 

Flýgur

til tín

__________________

 

(Morning

in march

 

My heart:

an oystercatcher

 

is flying

to you)

 

It is nearly impossible to translate this poem into proper German or English, because "Austernfischer" or "Oystercatcher" may be correct for bird watchers, but is not able to transport the romantic sense.

I'd like to ask, if the "Shalder" has a similar meaning for the Shetlands as the Tjaldur for the Faroes?

And if so, how would this poem sound in "Shetlan wird"?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kye is plural, the singular is Coo. Again a Scots form, although even in the strong Scots-speaking area where I live the plural form has died out, and even the 'broadest' Scots speakers say 'coos'.

Kye still used in lower deeside, no that there's many locals left farming.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd like to ask, if the "Shalder" has a similar meaning for the Shetlands as the Tjaldur for the Faroes?

I cant comment on that, but the sound of that bird always brings me back to the childhood summer holidays at my grandparents.

 

I don't think we look to the shalder as a harbinger of spring but we do look forward to the tirricks coming back as a sign of summer.

 

tirrick = Arctic tern. There are a few shalders in Shetland all winter nowadays, noteably at Clickimin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your comments.

 

A rough direct translation wid be:-

 

Mornin'

in Mairch

 

My Hert:

a Shalder

 

Is fleein'

tae dee

Thank you, I am very happy to get this text!

In the frisian dialects on our german coasts the name for oystercatcher is close to the word for love. A north-frisian version (Isle of Föhr) would be:

 

Maarnem

uun a marts

 

At hart

en liiw

 

flocht

tu di

 

There are a few shalders in Shetland all winter nowadays, noteably at Clickimin.

Most of your local shalders have there winter-holidays in southern British coasts. Some stay at home, as do some of the icelandic and some of the faroese. There is indeed a special name for the faroese winter-tjøldur: "vetrartjaldur".

(On our german coasts we have a winter holidays meeting of norwegian and russian oystercathers.)

 

The special faroese status of the tjaldur depends not only on romantics but on the historical identification of the faroese national movement with this brave bird. They had indeed an inofficial national flag, the "tjaldursflag". The St.Gregor's Day (grækarismessa/return of tjøldur/12.3.) is celebrated since 1943.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I refer to the thread "Nynorsk and Norwegian Language Policy":

I am using an European Dictionary of Common Names of Animals; Mammals and Birds with Germanic languages on

http://www.informatika.bf.uni-lj.si/magus-germanic.html

to compare the Shetlandic version with their relatives.

May I ask the native speakers which Norwegian language version is used in this dictionary?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...