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Birds, animals and idder beasties


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Au contraire mon ami.

 

That would be coalfish - coalfish - pollack :wink:

 

Pollack=Lyrie=Lure

 

Interesting thing I discovered though. In caithness they have another stage:

 

sillock - piltock - cuddies - saithe,

 

well, cuddies might just be saithe but it is yet another parochial age demarkation for this species. Further inference of the significance of the humble coalie in the NE of Scotland. More so than eskimos and snow, if you catch my drift -------get it? Drift?

 

Damn I'm good. :)

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No definately not bud!

Pollock and Coalfish are two different things....

Coalfish = Lure

Pollock = Lyrie

and definately big coalfish are called Lures in Shetland but when smaller they're all called sillocks and piltocks(this is why I was totally confused untill it was explained to me by Vic Robertson at a fishing competition)

 

very confusing till you read this

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollock

Pollock is the common name used for either of the two species of marine fish in the Pollachius genus.

I tend to think that piltock is used in the same way pollock is here untill the fish reach a certain size. Even then it would probably depend on where about in the isles you come from as to which name is used. ;)

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  • 5 months later...

I mind back idda dauy whin we wir joost peerie bairns, me an me freends wir dat prood o' wir island identity dat we wid only say "oops a cockaloorie" an wid get p*ssed aff wi onybody dat said "daisy."

 

We also insisted on singin in Shaetland dialect at choir, even whin da songs wirna Shaetland! "Donald whaur's dee breeks" cam ta be a bit o' a favourite...

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Guest Anonymous
No definately not bud!

Pollock and Coalfish are two different things....

Coalfish = Lure

Pollock = Lyrie

and definately big coalfish are called Lures in Shetland but when smaller they're all called sillocks and piltocks(this is why I was totally confused untill it was explained to me by Vic Robertson at a fishing competition)

 

 

Totally disagree.

Lure and Lyrie are both Shetland names for Pollock.

 

BTW the Norskie name is Lyr.

 

Coalfish are simply Sillocks, Piltocks, and Saithe.

 

Simples,, :D

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  • 5 weeks later...
Guest Anonymous

I have to admit that I'd be happier if the LHD called a Lythe a Lyrie, Luer, or Lyr. But I suppose they are dealing in the Scottish fishing sector so have to maintain a common language.

Their weekly report is always worth listening to. Stanley's casual reporting is a pleasure to listen to, in these days of sensationalism to most news items. :D

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  • 4 weeks later...

The Birds of Shetland book has an extensive list of Shetland bird names and their source - appendix 1 pp540-542.

 

this one

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Birds-Shetland-Helm-County-Avifauna/dp/0713660384/ref=sr_1_1/280-6454214-9970812?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1269698154&sr=1-1

 

and the annual Shetland Bird Report published by the Shetland Bird Club has the [known] Shetland names against the species accounts, as did the annual Shetland Sea Mammal Report until it went belly up a few years ago.

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  • 1 year later...

[***Mod edit - Split from "Puffins" in the Shetland News section.***]

 

^^^ Ta fur da link Groilick, will hiv tae hae a look at yun. Dunna laek tae say it but not a Tammie Norrie tae be seen at Sumburgh Head dis moarnin. Dir idder still in bed or aa geen back ta sea. Hardly ony Baukies idder. :cry:

 

Can you tell me the English term for the bird you refer to as a 'Baukie'? I've heard this described as a 'Burra word' (where it would be pronounced 'baakie') but I was never taught it when I was young. I was never able to figure out whether it was the (common?) guillemot, which I think is referred to elsewhere in Shetland as a 'longwie', or a razorbill. I presume it isn't the black guillemot (tystie).

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Nae doot someen will bring me tae heel on dis but we aye used da name Baukies mair as a generick term for all the Auk family, dat is Razorbills, Guillemots and Tysties. We used tae set aff in da fifties and first o da sixties wi buckets for Baukies eggs but laekely widna get awa wi it noo. :wink:

Canna say it's a name I hear much at da Ness , possibly a link from my Fair Isle roots.

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