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Nae doot someen will bring me tae heel on dis but we aye used da name Baukies mair as a generick term for all the Auk family, dat is Razorbills, Guillemots and Tysties. We used tae set aff in da fifties and first o da sixties wi buckets for Baukies eggs but laekely widna get awa wi it noo. :wink:

Canna say it's a name I hear much at da Ness , possibly a link from my Fair Isle roots.

 

Hmm. Maybe if it's a sort of allsorts name for Auks, it would explain why I've never been able to pin it down!

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^^ Yep, wid run wi dat DePooperit and wid agree " Baakies " definately Burra. Wid be interesting tae ken whit day caa dem in Unst ?.

Wir kinda drifted aff da treed but dis wiz da Baukies on da Sumburgh Stack on 10th April. Dis moarnin only aboot a dizzen so hope dem and da Norries back damoarn. :-

 

http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb479/beenister/Baukies.jpg

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Fae Njugle :- Baukies, we a slight "ch" soond on da k. No sure how tae properly write it phonetically!

 

Wid agree wi dat, which micht tak wiz tae Channerwick versus Shandrick ! :roll:

 

Off topic entirely, but a tourist many years ago apparently couldn't get her head round either name and insisted on calling it "Candlewick". :lol:

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Fae Njugle :- Baukies, we a slight "ch" soond on da k. No sure how tae properly write it phonetically!

 

Wid agree wi dat, which micht tak wiz tae Channerwick versus Shandrick ! :roll:

 

Off topic entirely, but a tourist many years ago apparently couldn't get her head round either name and insisted on calling it "Candlewick". :lol:

an a bit farder aff topic:

I heard dat Scousburgh wis an owerseas colony o’ Liverpool!

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Drawing fae a fairly strong Ness connection, Baukies were specifically Guillemots, Sea-Craa's were Razorbills. I'm heard dat aa me life.

 

Right. I'm familiar with 'tystie' - Black Guillemot, and get 'sea-craa' as Razorbill, although I'm not familar with it. So what sort of Guillemot was 'baukie' in your area? A specific variety, or any sort of Guillemot that didn't have another name?

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Fae Njugle :- Baukies, we a slight "ch" soond on da k. No sure how tae properly write it phonetically!

 

Wid agree wi dat, which micht tak wiz tae Channerwick versus Shandrick ! :roll:

 

Off topic entirely, but a tourist many years ago apparently couldn't get her head round either name and insisted on calling it "Candlewick". :lol:

an a bit farder aff topic:

I heard dat Scousburgh wis an owerseas colony o’ Liverpool!

 

Well, there was one scouser and some of her family that did live there for quite a while. I didna think they'd taken the place over though.

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Drawing fae a fairly strong Ness connection, Baukies were specifically Guillemots, Sea-Craa's were Razorbills. I'm heard dat aa me life.

 

Right. I'm familiar with 'tystie' - Black Guillemot, and get 'sea-craa' as Razorbill, although I'm not familar with it. So what sort of Guillemot was 'baukie' in your area? A specific variety, or any sort of Guillemot that didn't have another name?

Common Guillemot

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/g/guillemot/index.aspx

As far as I'm aware there are only two types of guillemot, tystie and baukie, while there are several other auks, each with their own specific local names.

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Drawing fae a fairly strong Ness connection, Baukies were specifically Guillemots, Sea-Craa's were Razorbills. I'm heard dat aa me life.

 

Right. I'm familiar with 'tystie' - Black Guillemot, and get 'sea-craa' as Razorbill, although I'm not familar with it. So what sort of Guillemot was 'baukie' in your area? A specific variety, or any sort of Guillemot that didn't have another name?

Common Guillemot

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/g/guillemot/index.aspx

As far as I'm aware there are only two types of guillemot, tystie and baukie, while there are several other auks, each with their own specific local names.

 

Ah, the penny's dropped at last. I think I imagined that all the other auks might be called 'guillemot' - didn't realise the term only applied to these two.

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Is onybody heard da swaabie caa'd da "swart back"?. I believe it means/translates as "Black Back". Is it connected tae "Swaarbaks Minn"(am I spelt it right)?.

 

What we need in Shetland is a picture book wi da names. You could hae different catagories like, fish, birds, insects, animals etc.

 

It would also help preserve da names.

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