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Living in Grobsness


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Mercifully, I have no sick children, so this is not the crime of the century.

 

are you forgetting the ones you keep in the car boot? if they weren't sick when they were bundled in, they should be pretty well malnourished by now...

 

You'd be surprised at how long a “youngling†can last on anti-freeze and the inside lining of a spare tyre... :o :wink:

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and all this from the woman, who appeared on a t.v documentary, saying that shetland was the palce to be with autistic kids, the same woman who dumped here kid on the doorstep of a shetland care home, and threw the social work department into disarray. the same woman who has done nothing but write letters to national papers and complain about shetland from the day she got here. i know one solution to her problem, and i am sure many will agree with me when i say that the solution is in her own hands, it leaves lerwick 7 night a week, barring refits of course.

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Woah horsey, that's a bit harsh, to say the least!

 

There's nothing wrong with somebody relocating in the hope that they will find a better life for their family. Maybe she is disappointed with the facilities available for her and perhaps doesn't express her concerns or comments in the most beneficial manner. I wouldn't want to comment as I don't feel it's my place.

 

I do know that nobody would know how they would deal with having an autisitc child until they experience it first hand, frustrations and stresses are dealt with in various manners.

 

Maybe moving somewhere less remote within Sheltand would be a better option, but I think basically suggesting she leaves is ludicrous...unless of course that's what she wants. She's allowed to have an opinion is she not?

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as a parent of 2 autistic kids, i know exactly how poor the facilities, and support are her in shetland for anyone with mental health problems, hence our now leaving shetland. had she bothered to do some research before moving to shetland, she would have found out, that this is not the ideal place for children with severe autism

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I'm sorry to hear that, I can understand your frustrations. As I said, perhaps she didn't deal with situations in the best possible way and perhaps she could have done more research. I honestly don't know enough about the situation to critisize, but I just felt that the manner of the post was a bit harsh.

 

It's a real shame the facilities in Shetland aren't suffice and you feel it's an unsuitable place for poeple with autism to live in. Perhaps there's a good point being made then?

 

Do you mind me asking if you think it's a current crises or if the situation is likely to improve? Are there any plans for improvements?

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there is to be a new unit built out at the empty site near the fish box, however it will be at least 3 - years before it is up and running. in shetland if oyu have mental health problems / learning difficulties, there is plenty of provision, as long as the problem is not to severe, while one is at school, however as we all know we all gett older. and between the ages of 18 and 65 there are no provisions made for anyone with mental health issues in shetland, hence so many shetlanders being shipped off to the likes of cornhill in aberdeen

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Vailron wrote

there is to be a new unit built out at the empty site near the fish box, however it will be at least 3 - years before it is up and running. in shetland if oyu have mental health problems / learning difficulties, there is plenty of provision, as long as the problem is not to severe, while one is at school, however as we all know we all gett older. and between the ages of 18 and 65 there are no provisions made for anyone with mental health issues in shetland, hence so many shetlanders being shipped off to the likes of cornhill in aberdeen

 

That is not exactly true.....Annsbrae and the assisted living project do offer some help.

 

However there are shortcomings with the system and I am left asking if the SIC that provides social services is the same SIC that wants a mega arts centre and a bridge too far (or to Bressay). Ok so I know all about the excuses that money from one fund can not be used for another project but I bet if it was election time and there was a public demand for something it would get built.

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yes ilp and annsbrae do offer some help, but that is entirely dependent on the severity of the mental illness. anyone with really severe autism, has no facilities to help whatsoever, neither do those suffering schizophrenia, the authorities answer here, is to jail them or section them and fly them down to cornhill

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I had one o yun "SHETLAND'S ON TV!" moments you know so well yonks ago one night when I was at home. It followed the story of the lovely family from south-east England who were having a pitiful time with their local provision of care for their two autistic children. My heart really went out to them, as living in urban city surroundings was extremely difficult for the children, and then their parents, to deal with.

 

Forgive me if I've no got all the details right, it was a while ago, but as far as I mind they had no end of problems to deal wi, in particular finding a school for their eldest son. What came across to me was how much the Mam & Dad loved & cared for their children, and how desperate and exhausted they were with hitting one brick wall after another. The level of noise & stimulation around their home seemed to only worsen the kids' autism and hence the family's ability to cope. I found myself gripped to their story, and actually praying that they would get help. They realised their only hope was to leave the area, and began searching for a home. One or two didn't work out and they were so disappointed. When the next house they were looking at was in Shetland I couldn't believe it! My first reaction was - oh wow, what a perfect place for them, all that space, peace and quiet, at last those kids can thrive, Mum and Dad can chill out and get a well-earned rest and they can start enjoying family life.

 

Many folk come from a background that is a totally different wye fae here, where city-level amenities are all they've ever known. We forget just how used we are wi remoteness, both from the mainland and throughout the many networks of tiny roads and islands. For us, stocking up is maybe second-nature: even in Lerwick there is nowhere to buy even a pint of milk past 11pm; for life-long city-livers they've never known anything but 24-hour-everything-&-everywhere.

 

Noo maybe dat's hard enough to get used to when all wir speakin aboot is havin black tea till da mornin, but thinkin o poorly bairns and medicine and your first experience in your life o remoteness, it must have been a very frightening time for them. Mind, we learn from wir mistakes, and we learn by wir experiences. She'll likely no run oot again in a hurry, and is probably mortified that it's so well known. Let's give her a break. We've all likely been caught short some time. And mind the reason folk in glass houses shouldna throw stones is that it can damage the house wir living in, too.

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