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Baking Real Bread


fairislefaerie
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Because of the complexities Im going to write this in stages & include pics for each stage of each recipe so that those who wish to partake in a bread fest can really see what they are aiming for.

 

First off & most importantly... An ingredients list, most of which can be got from Scoops.

 

 

Organic unbleached bread flour (scoops)

Organic wholewheat bread flour (scoops)

Organic rye flour (scoops)

Organic instant yeast (Dove brand from scoops is the best & the best value)

Diastatic barley malt (the homebrew shop)

Polenta grind corn meal (scoops)

Organic pasta flour (scoops) (no we arent making pasta, this is the best stuff to top dress your loaf with before it goes into the oven)

 

 

You also need an old roasting tray to turn into a steam try in your oven, a pump spray oil dispenser & some nice big bowls & the will to try something new.

 

 

 

The first starter we are going to do is a low yeast starter, which helps you get used to how a wild yeast starter will work & behave & its the perfect recipe to teach you to be very light handed as you handle the dough in each stage.

 

 

So, dream up your perfect sandwhich to grace within authentic ciabatta. This is a soft & self willed (runny) dough, which will only bend to the will of those with light hands, so gentle is your mantra for this one.

 

 

First stage is to make a Poolish, which is a light & sloppy yeast starter, looks much like a very frothy pancake batter when it is ready.

 

 

11.25 oz of organic unbleached bread flour

12fl oz of water at room temp

1/4 a teaspoon of instant yeast.

 

 

Mix everything together using a butter knife, making sure you scrape down the bowl often to ensure all the flour hydrates, cover the bowl with cling film then sit it in a quiet corner of the kitchen for 3 to 4 hrs until it becomes really bubbly & foamy. Place in the fridge overnight to retard it.

(Retarding slows the fermentation down to very very little & this slow fermentation draws the maximum of flavour out from the flour)

 

 

Stage 2 + pics tomorrow.

 

 

If anyone would like some Glutton free recipe's for breads, please holler up & i'll cover some of those too.

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This is the Poolish I made about an hr ago just before I nipped the kids up to school, you can see it is already starting to ferment & has started also to increase in volume

 

 

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a269/Scottishspinner/poolish.jpg

 

 

 

 

Stage 2...

 

 

Remove your poolish from the fridge (it can stay in there up to 35hrs) and let it sit for 2 hrs to come upto room temp & regain its full activity.

 

 

~~~

 

 

Into a bowl put.

 

13.5oz of unbleached bread flour

1 teaspoon of salt (level)

1.25 teaspoon of instant yeast

 

Give it a stir to mix it up a little then add

 

7 tablespoons of lukewarm water & the poolish. Mix gently with a large spoon to start then more vigorously to incorporate everything. Flour your worksurface & gently knead the dough for 2 to 3 mins.

 

Using the heel of your hand gently pat the dough into a rectangle approx 8" x 6"

 

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a269/Scottishspinner/hatch1070.jpg

 

 

Then leave the dough to rest for 5 mins.

 

Once rested take each end (one at a time) and stretch the dough to elongate it 9 to 10 inches each side.

 

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a269/Scottishspinner/hatch1071.jpg

 

Take one side & fold it over 1/3rd, take the other side & fold it over the top of the first fold

 

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a269/Scottishspinner/hatch1072.jpg

 

It now resembles a letter fold.

 

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a269/Scottishspinner/hatch1073.jpg

 

 

Spray lightly with oil, cover with a piece of cling film & leave to proof for 1hr.

 

Repeat the stretch & fold once more then proof for a further hr.

 

 

Gently cut the now risen dough into 8 pieces along its width & carry out the stretch & fold on each piece then place onto a floured baking tray.

 

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a269/Scottishspinner/hatch1074.jpg

 

 

Heat the oven to gas 7 & remember to put your steam tray on the bottom of the oven when you turn it on. Turn on the kettle when the oven is just about ready.

 

Once up to temp, pour 2 or 3 cupfulls of boiled water into the tray & place the rolls to bake in the shelf just under the middle of the oven. Give it 2 mins then pour 1 more cup of water into the tray, reduce heat to gas 6. Wait 10 mins, reduce heat to gas 5. Wait 10 mins then turn the oven off.. Do not open the door for at least another 10 mins.

 

Take tray out of the oven & place rolls on a wire rack to cool.

 

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a269/Scottishspinner/hatch1075.jpg

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Guest posiedon
the homebrew shop

???

is the one in shetland or am I going to have to order fae south?

The fishing tackle shop on market st sells all the home brew gear 8)

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That looks great. Is the dough suitable for pizza? (my main reason for making dough)

Also surprised there's no sugar to "feed" the yeast. First house I worked in (where I first started making bread) was told yeast needed to be fed on sugar and then to stop it growing then you'd add salt, eighteen loaves a day, I remember that recipe in my sleep.

Also wondering if it would work with brioche, bairn sampled Bo's from the olive tree now she's decided we've got to make some. Oh the fun. Still miss just being able to crumble a cube of yeast though. Why is it so hard to get hold of in this country?

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Supermarkets use frozen bread from CDF simply take out of freezer strait into oven, add huge mark up for bread being "fresh".

After asking around it seems most bakers round here use instant (with new flour improvers you hardly notice the difference), and scoop has confirmed they don't get it in anymore because by the time it gets here it's past it's best before date.

Just read the link, the two supermarkets up here are from chains that use CDF. No actual baking training needed other than how to turn on an oven. Smaller supermarkets with their own bakeries sometimes use fresh yeast but instant is easier for them, and customers don't notice.

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