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Music file sharing


peeriebryan
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Music file sharing?  

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  1. 1. Music file sharing?

    • I share files, and i'm not bothered about the consequences
      11
    • I share files, but I don't feel good about it
      3
    • I share files as a 'taster' before buying official CDs/downloads
      4
    • I don't share files
      9


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www.mp3search.ru

 

$0.10 a track and it is legal. $1.36 for an album average.

 

 

 

Only legal due to russia's dubious lack of electronic copyright laws. That's why it's so cheap, the artists and others aren't getting their money from it. You're effectively just paying someone else to steal it for you. :?

 

 

Shame, because these sorts of sites seem to be the only ones which offer tracks at a decent bitrate.

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www.mp3search.ru

 

$0.10 a track and it is legal. $1.36 for an album average.

Only legal due to russia's dubious lack of electronic copyright laws. That's why it's so cheap, the artists and others aren't getting their money from it. You're effectively just paying someone else to steal it for you. :?

 

This website is, as far as I can see, a scam. Its hard to tell, since their legal pages are all in Russian!

 

In the early days of downloading, hundreds of these sites sprang up, claiming to offer legal downloads. All they were doing was ripping CDs, or downloading mp3s, and charging 'customers' for 'legal' downloads. No royalties were ever paid to artists or record companies. Thankfully, these practices have largely been stamped out in countries which have reasonably stringent intellectual property laws.

 

As a rule of thumb, (many) Eastern Block and (many) Asian countries have ineffectual copyright protection laws, and others, such as China, don't even recognise the principal of copyright (China pays lip service to copyright in order to please the West, but has no cultural history of such concepts)

 

As far as the Russian website in question goes (www.mp3search.ru) I would be VERY surprised of any of the income is passed on to artists, record companies or royalty collection agencies. That's the reason they can be sold so cheaply.

 

There is no way an international record company is going to agree to the prices they're selling downloads for. $0.10 a track and $1.36 for an album. No major recording artist's record company is going to accept 6 or 7 cents or whatever their share per download? Alarm bells should be ringing! If you look into the argy bargy between iTunes and the major record companies regarding track prices, you'll see what I mean

 

To be honest, you're better of using peer to peer networks. That way Russian gangsters and blackmarket types aren't getting your money

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The copyright talks of:

 

 

All electronic products placed on MP3Search.Ru are according to the current legislation of the Russian Federation. In particular on the basis of:

 

* The law "About the copyright and the adjacent rights " (from July, 09th, 1993 in edition from July, 20th, 2004).

 

* Agreements with "the Federation of legal owners on collective management of Copyrights in the use of products in the Interactive Mode".

 

(don't get the Interactive bit?)

 

This is the interesting bit:

 

* Agreements from Open Company " the Content and the Right " and system MP3Express.

* Agreements from Open Company " something?-MEDIA " and system DigitalOne.

 

 

Thats the gist of it?!?

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That has not been thought through methinks...Who could lay claim to a piece of music? Presuming people will still buy the music, copyright proves authorship (sic?) of it. A piece of my music has been recorded misspelt and misplayed by several bands (although some have been spot on and I've received royalties for it), and this doesn't really bother me as it's not my livelihood. Ownership (that's better) is important when it comes to your own creations (think about patenting an invention).

 

There is so much untapped, unheard, creative music out there, the removal of copyright would do nothing to make it more accessible.

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The copyright talks of:

 

 

All electronic products placed on MP3Search.Ru are according to the current legislation of the Russian Federation. In particular on the basis of:

 

* The law "About the copyright and the adjacent rights " (from July, 09th, 1993 in edition from July, 20th, 2004).

 

* Agreements with "the Federation of legal owners on collective management of Copyrights in the use of products in the Interactive Mode".

 

(don't get the Interactive bit?)

 

This is the interesting bit:

 

* Agreements from Open Company " the Content and the Right " and system MP3Express.

* Agreements from Open Company " something?-MEDIA " and system DigitalOne.

 

 

Thats the gist of it?!?

 

I hadn't scrolled down far enough before .. or they've just added ..?!?

 

НП "Федерация правообладателей по коллективному управлению Авторскими правами при использовании произведений в Интерактивном Режиме" и НП "Федерация Обладателей Смежных Прав" являются организациями по коллективному управлению авторскими и смежными правами, созданы и действуют в соответствии с Законом РФ "Об авторском праве и смежных правах".

 

Note: " Federation of legal owners on collective management of Copyrights at use of products in the Interactive Mode " and НП " Federation of Owners of the Adjacent Rights " are the organizations on collective management of the author's and adjacent rights, are created and operate according to the Law of the Russian Federation " About the copyright and the adjacent rights ".

 

НП ФАИР осуществляет сбор и распределение авторского вознаграждения, а так же на основании Генерального соглашения с НП ФОСП от 26.09.05г. собирает вознаграждение для исполнителей и производителей фонограмм.

 

Note: АИР carries out gathering and distribution of the award, and as on the basis of the General agreement with НП ФОСП from 26.09.05г. Collects compensation for executors and manufacturers of soundtracks.

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If it wasn't for downloading music I wouldn't have heard some of the great music that I have.

 

Most of my downloads now are using bit torrent either for TV shows from the states and bootleg concerts. Not very often I'm getting albums unless I've heard a particulary good bootleg by someone I don't know.

 

As for using p2p it really is old stuff there is more files available via Bit Torrent, Newsgroups and DC hubs than was ever available through p2p networks.

 

Mind the only problem I have now is the amount of storage required - I've already lost about 250Gigs of mp3s due to hard drive failure.

 

Also if I had the money I would be buying the CD's but as I have four kids and a grandchild in the house money is tight and this is the only way to keep my feed my addiction. It also doesn't help that I like all music and know no boundaries.

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The below article is an example of the conjecture and guess work which the record industry would have us believe is fact

Illegal downloads cost UK music industry 1 bln

 

The British music industry lost more than one billion pounds in the past three years as a result of people illegally filesharing on the Internet rather than paying for music, its trade organisation said on Tuesday.
How can they possibly know that! How do they have any idea how many files have been illegally swopped? How can they know how many sales would have been made if people hadn't obtained them illegaly? Are they assuming that for every file illegaly downloaded, then the record industry has lost the equivalent of a sale? The BPI refuse to reveal their methodology for arriving at these figures (believe me, I'm sick of emailing them)

 

But the loss to the industry is bigger because those who still download illegally would be the individuals expected to spend the most on music.
"Expected to spend the most"? The exact opposite has been found by independant researchers who are happy to publish their methods and findings. Here's an example of just one of the indepandant studies Downloading 'Myths' challenged
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You widna see Beyonce goin roond da coop, you widna see colplay on holiday in butlins, you widna see mick jagger getting meals on wheels, and yu widna see boyzone busking, and until any of those type of things happen , i will be downloading freebies, they get an aaful lot o money for no doing very much, talent or no talent.

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Apparenty, only 1 in 10 acts that get signed actually turn a profit for their record company, so the profitable acts subsidise the smaller acts and the new signings.

 

The potential revenue 'lost' due to people illegaly downloading major acts tracks means there is less money in the pot to fund new acts. Thats one of the reasons why new acts are under so much pressure to make instant profit nowadays.

 

I just wish that the record companies would tell us something approaching the truth instead of sensationalising the illegal download figures

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  • 2 years later...

Why dont the broadband providers as part of the monthly payment include a package which allows you to download?

 

An extra 5 pound a month (or whatever) to download music, vids etc. This way artists can get paid.

 

Imagine if 30,000 plays on Myspace equals say £30 quid or even £3.00 it would at least be something.

 

I attended a seminar held by Skinny Magazine recently 'The challenge of the new Reality'. Pete Jenners and Simon Frith both spoke of broadband providers somehow making payment to artists. I agree with this but getting this money distributed to the artists fairly without causing the listener too much grief may be harder than we think.

 

Would this include unsigned acts too? There are so many these days that it would probably bust BT. :)

 

Signed artists can afford to give away their music for free as they make enough money from merchandise sales and ticket sales but for new artists and upcoming bands this is not the case.

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I'm sure I read somewhere that if everyone paid a fiver extra for their broadband then all DRM could be scrapped and all content could made freely available to everyone. Of course, as you point out, distribution of the money raises problems of it's own.

 

I'll have a dig, see if I can find that article. (don't hold your breath tho') :wink:

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