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Problem with AC97 Onboard Sound and Loud Fans


Stu-Fred
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Noo dan.

 

A'm just gotten a computer assembled. Seems t' run ok but da fans are really loud and am gettin no audio output from da onboard AC97 sound. Drivers seem t' be fine and da onboard sound is enabled in da BIOS. Just no sound. I have ordered a 5.1 PCI Card t' see if dat mite work.

 

Any ideas? :?

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All windows updates done ?

 

Also, not so long ago at least under XP there was I seem to recal a windows update which broke onboard AC97 sound and you need to get the latest sound drivers after that to make it work again.

 

Is it the CPU fan thats loud, or the PSU fan, or another one ?

 

(It might just be there is a DVD/CD in the drive and thats making the noise..)

 

 

A real sound card would be better, though that can cause issues with hard disk corruption if your unlucky :-)

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The only thing I can think of as far as the fans are concerned is to make sure as many as possible are powered via the motherboard and that all of the heat /fan speed management features are switched on. Another thing would be to unplug all but the processor and graphics card fans to see if you can find out which are causing the noise. If it's the fans on the processor and graphics card that are the source of the noise, then consider new coolers (if it's really that annoying). If its case fans then try swapping them with others from another PC or just leaving them off.

 

I wouldn't bother with any of that sound insulation stuff you can buy. One of my mates bought the stuff to try and deaden the roar from his leafblower of a PC and all he achieved was trapping more heat inside the case forcing the fans to work harder. It made absolutely no difference to the noise.

A real sound card would be better, though that can cause issues with hard disk corruption if your unlucky

Eh??

Ditto, Eh?

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Few tips on reducing fan sound ~

 

Determine if you have onboard fan management.

If so, the fan speed will be governed by the cpu core temperature.

Fit a larger fan it will move the same amount of air at a slower speed= less noise.

You can obtain a step up adaptor for standad cpu heatsinks where the fan is normally fixed directly to the top of the heatsink.

Some more expensive mobos also have case temperature sensors but in the most fitting a larger fan will not be possible because the case outlet/inlet apertures are a standard size.

In general the case fan is not controled and if you want to control the speed, you need to fit a controler. Most cases come with aperatures which allow a second case fan to be fitted. This is to allow extra cooling if are an overclocking freak. You can wire two fans in series cutting down the speed dramaticaly and this shifts the same amount of air.

The noise itself is generated at the leading edge of the fan blade and basically you get dispropotionately more noise the faster the rotational speed. The same approach is used in ultra quiet PSU ie multiple fans or a large fan moving more slowly. (I have one of these PSU's fitted and it helps a lot).

Graphic card fans tend to be smaller and run faster = noise. I would not recomend tampering with these but you can get kits to upgrade these fans. You can get some versions of garaphic cards with passive cooling.

 

There is also another option which comes form of a function panel and allows additional control over the fan speed and will also display component temperatures and rotational speeds. They cost about £35.

 

Zog

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^^ Was that the c*cked up "accidentally bootable" driver disks?

 

When you installed from the CD then rebooted, if the BIOS was set to boot from CD it did so and knackered the MBR.

 

Not exactly corrupting the HD but would seem so for a majority of people.

 

RE AC97 Audio - there is no such thing, in my experience, as "generic" drivers, especially if dealing with MB's from HP/Compaq or Dell systems.

 

Edit - realised that must be some sort of record for unhelpful posts!

 

..... so if you have a board like that you may need to look to the "build" companies site rather than MB manufacturer for drivers.

 

(cynicism perhaps slighly in overdrive having discovered HP use their own design of AGP slot. nothing a junior hacksaw cant fix though :) )

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http://www.3dgameman.com/forums//archive/index.php/t-2094.html

 

> Dyanmat rocks! you can find similar products out there,

 

http://www.avforums.com/forums/sounds-cards-mics-headsets-computer-speakers/200700-budget-pc-sound-proofing.html

 

> I have used 'Laminate Floor Underlay' in my PC.

>

> It is the 'expensive' £3/m² type that has the foil back and is made

> of an inert heavy density felt type of foam.

 

My own experience is I found an old PC thrown out which had a thick piece of heavy dense felt type foam on the inside of it. (Specifically on the side panel that you take off.) So I carefully peeled it off and put it on my own PC, of which I noticed a reduction in noise level, which I assume was from the dampening effect which stopped the side of the case behaving like a drum.

 

Though, in my efforts to find the ultimate solution, I was once asking for some thick foam and someone suggested a brick wall would work best, and as a PC vendor was giving away some free bricks on Christmas day...

 

http://www.nanos.org.uk/me/pictures/tnroom06.jpg

 

Two servers sit behind here and are much quieter due to the wall!

 

 

As for sound card issues:

 

http://alive.singnet.com.sg/tech/via.htm

 

> The Sound Blaster Live! Drivers were not to PCI specifications

 

 

If a specific fan is noisy, a regrease can work wonders! (Shame you cannot get PC fans with nipples to more easily regrease them, as I hate having to every year or two redo my fans.)

 

 

To fit larger fans its sometimes necessary to take a hacksaw or do a spot of panel beating to get them to fit.

 

Another thing I found that can work well in practice depending on how well your case is designed in the first place is to tape up and block the side air vents, forcing the air to come in from the front and out the back.

 

I have tried also big heat sink graphics cards, but find they get so hot, I need an extra fan to help cool the case anyhow :-)

 

A friend of mine solves the problem by having his PC fitted under his floorboards!

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