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Helicopter Ditches in North Sea


Tomblands
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I think they were scrapped due to the fact they interfered with the signal from the aircrafts and liferafts beacons. see this article

http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/1131650?UserKey=

 

There are two types of personal locator beacons, one which passengers can wear on their wrist and there are ones fitted on the new type of lifejackets and some companies use. Not sure if both are now not being used.

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I know a few helicopter techs and none of them would fly in one...doesn't that say something?

 

My father has been working with choppers for nearly 40 years and regularly flies on them as part of his job so how did these few techs get away with not flying during testing?.

 

Bearing in mind how many flights there are in the north sea every day and the amount of incidents there has been in the last nigh on 40 years it does show how safe flying on a chopper is.

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and so it rises...if they're missing they're probably goners too...

goes with the job I guess. I know a few helicopter techs and none of them would fly in one...doesn't that say something?

 

Well that's a really helpful post for folk who work offshore and rely on helicopters to get them to their work :roll:

 

Suggest you engage brain before operating your keyboard.

 

excuse me for breathing....

if you don't like the truth....

 

I'm sure they have been up in them too, but they wouldn't do it out of choice.

 

like I said tho it goes with the job, you know the risks involved when you take it on...that's why offshore workers get paid so much. I personally dont begrudge them a penny of it either!

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Again, look at the stats. I think it's 6 crashes in the North Sea that have resulted in fatalities since 1976, that's not a lot when you consider the number that go back and fore to the platforms day in day out. Now consider the stats for the number of people that die on the roads in Scotland per year, I think you'll find that proportionately helicopters are safer. Then again if you don't want to believe the facts then that's up to you.

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A little knowledge is a dangerous thing MF they were not grounded to have their main gearboxes changed, they were grounded to have the bolts that held a filter housing onto the main gear box changed due to advice from the aircraft manufacturer after the Cougar S92 ditched off Newfoundland.

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^yep, all true but the fact is if that big fan on top of them stops turning for whatever reason they'll drop like a stone. No gliding in....just splat!

Helicopters are not the safest way to get people out to rigs, they're the only way....

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Again incorrect if the mechanical means of turning the rotorhead fails as long as the rotorhead and blades and drivetrain remain intact the crew can in certain circumstances preform a procedure called auto-rotation and use that to decend to the ground or sea, it is practiced by helicopter crews as part of their ongoing training.

 

If however there is a catastrophic failure of components then it is likely that the aircraft will be unable to remain in flight, this is not peculiar to rotary-wing aircraft it can also happen to fixed-wing aircraft as well MF

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I've got to say it does sound (speculation of course) that there has been some kind of rotorhead related failure.

 

I've seen many autorotations and been on-board during a few, if the crew were in a position to autorotate the aircraft, I believe the outcome would be somewhat different. As it stands at the moment, it doesn't look like the crew were able to reduce the rate of decent... Very sad.

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Yes I've heard of auto-rotation, practiced by the military but relatively recent as far as civilian pilots are concerned. Fine as long as the gearbox hasn't been damaged. Don't be fooled into thinking it's a simple procedure to carry out.

 

The main problem with fixed wing aircraft these days is that if the powerplants stop working the hydraulics do also so there's little/no control.

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