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Shetland needs a restricted driving licence system backed up by further training and testing on the mainland.

 

There is some merit in your suggestion but, it isn't going to improve the (generally) appalling driving standards you can see around Shetland every day of the week and, it is not always locals who are the problem..

Stupid (and aggressive) drivers come here from all parts.

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Colin - I agree to a point, but you have only got to see three locals arrive at a 3 junction roundabout at the same time to give yourself a smile as they all look at each other wondering who is going to go first. Simple, arrive at a roundabout intending to go not intending to stop.

 

Kavi - There is a question whether this person remains competent to be on the road driving around in a half ton weapon.

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You can't tar everybody with the same brush and I guess the truth is there are good and there are bad drivers in Shetland.

 

:)

 

You will find there are a similar proportion of bad driver all over. I don't think driving on a motorway will enhance skills on Shetland. Motorway driving can be as dangerous due to the ease folk can be occupied by other things.

 

What you will have to do, is accept that there are different levels of skills within the driving community and drive accordingly. That way, less chance of accident and injury.

Really, if you want to drive to show off your skills as a driver, then support the Shetland Car Clubs in their bid to get some sort of track. Chances are, you will discover you may not be as good as you think, but safe.

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Shetland needs a restricted driving licence system backed up by further training and testing on the mainland.

 

There is some merit in your suggestion but, it isn't going to improve the (generally) appalling driving standards you can see around Shetland every day of the week and, it is not always locals who are the problem..

Stupid (and aggressive) drivers come here from all parts.

:lik:

Last time I drove sooth, I thought the standard of driving was horrendous with no courtesy for other road users. Things are not bad here :(

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Guest Lone Wolf

I passed my test down South - in a major city. I did no training on a motorway, but got up early one morning to hone my skills when there were few others cars about, once I'd passed my test. It's only once you've passed that you learn how to become a capable driver. The driving test and learning process are too short to encompass every eventuality.

 

The standard of some drivers in Shetland is poor, whether too fast or too slow, but they are few and far between. On the whole the standard is more than adequate and I am in full agreement with owre-weel that courtesy on Shetland roads is generally very high and something to be admired.

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I think that we are getting competence and manners confused.

 

I would be happy to suggest a plate with an R on it, (for Restricted) to be fitted to cars driven by drivers who have passed their test in Shetland. Make it a metre square and fit it to the roof of the car so it's easily visible. At least then, when driving alongside the co-op to the roundabout, in the right hand lane, with a straight ahead arrow painted on the ground, the driver intending to go straight on but signalling right, those of us who took a proper driving test will be more aware that we should ignore any indication.

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I think that we are getting competence and manners confused.

 

I would be happy to suggest a plate with an R on it, (for Restricted) to be fitted to cars driven by drivers who have passed their test in Shetland. Make it a metre square and fit it to the roof of the car so it's easily visible. At least then, when driving alongside the co-op to the roundabout, in the right hand lane, with a straight ahead arrow painted on the ground, the driver intending to go straight on but signalling right, those of us who took a proper driving test will be more aware that we should ignore any indication.

 

I like many others who have passed their test in Shetland have driven sooth on a regular basis throughout too many years to mention, and guess what! I managed it without any problems :D

 

The only time I came near to a prang, was due to inconsiderate drivers who were in too much of a hurry and showed no consideration to other road users, swapping lanes and nearly putting me off the road. Just because you passed your test in the big world doesn't automatically make you a better driver and vice versa.

 

I agree there are some incompetent drivers here, but there are just as many down south. At least the incompetent drivers here tend to have manners rather then the arrogance you can be faced with on the mainland.

 

Perhaps those who pass their tests sooth should have a metre square sign on top of their car until they learn to appreciate that not all drivers can be as competent as the experts from the mainland :wink:

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Another reason that we shouldn't test up here as well as a lack of dual carriageways. yellow box junctions, level crossings gated and otherwise, low bridges, fords, double mini roundabouts, motorways, filtered traffic lights urban clearways etc. etc. Shetland needs a restricted driving licence system backed up by further training and testing on the mainland.

 

But doesn't the manned crossing to go across the airport runway count as a gated crossing? Whilst I've yet to see a 'ford' in Shetland, there's at least one 'flood' warning that I'm aware of. In comparison, I don't recall driving on any single track roads in London and you were lucky if you managed to get into top gear, let alone get above 30 even on some dual carriageways (Tell a lie, you could do 60mph on the A13 or North Circular at 2am :wink:). I never drove in fog in London either, let alone horizontal rain/snow.

 

I did, however, nearly get nudged off my motorbike near a mini-roundabout in East London as a herd of cows were being moved off Wanstead Flats! Yes, cows in London. Lovely afternoon up at a local bikers' haunt, nearly home, goes around a corner and OMG, brakes on as I sooooo wasn't expecting around 50 cows to be in the road! It doesn't matter where you drive as you should be on the lookout for any eventuality.

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The driving standards in Shetland are just as good as anywhere else in the UK .

 

The problem is we do not have as many different roundabouts, traffic lights ect that are in other towns for those learning to get experience.

 

I for one very often signal incorrectly or unnecessarily at some roundabouts mainly to let other traffic know what I am NOT going to do.. In other words I am NOT coming to starboard but keeping course to port, or straight ahead !

 

It is those people who enter the roundabouts & keep signalling right when in fact they are going straight ahead & leaving the roundabout, that are the biggest problem because one has to give way unnecessarily in case they do come to the right & they have right of way.

 

My observation over many years of driving is that one the biggest problem on the roads is those who drive far to close. Keep your distance especially now in the winter & give yourself some room for manoeuvre when for instance you suddenly find that you are on ice.

 

So soothmoothers are better driver’s maybe?. Some of the worst driving I witness is self drive vehicles apparently being driven by strangers who obviously do not know the roads, are in a hurry & overtake in some ridiculous places compromising everyone’s safety.

 

As has already been said there is no way we can all be perfect drivers it is no different to anything else ,some of us have skills that others do not .We are all different & that is also true to driveing

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I was at a driver course this week as part of my work and the instructor said that the Shetland drivers who drive sooth are actually better than the ones sooth themselves!.

 

His reason for saying this was that driving sooth is predominately just a case of following the signs and obeying markings whereas here because the driving is so mixed up you have to think about what you're doing.

 

8)

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At least then, when driving alongside the co-op to the roundabout, in the right hand lane, with a straight ahead arrow painted on the ground, the driver intending to go straight on but signalling right, those of us who took a proper driving test will be more aware that we should ignore any indication.

Does this one maybe come down to 2 different perspectives on "straight ahead"?

From Rule 186 - https://www.gov.uk/using-the-road-159-to-203/roundabouts-184-to-190

When taking an exit to the right or going full circle, unless signs or markings indicate otherwise

 

signal right and approach in the right-hand lane

keep to the right on the roundabout until you need to change lanes to exit the roundabout

signal left after you have passed the exit before the one you want.

 

Now to some, driving Holmsgarth Road to "that bit of the A970 that I'm not sure if it has a name" might be thought of as "straight ahead", while others will be sure that, as there is more than 180 degrees between the 2 roads, it's clearly "an exit to the right"?

 

Going from the Co-op arm to the north is pretty much the same angle... how should that turn be signaled?

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I always signal at the roundabouts at either end of Holmsgarth Road, whichever exit I'm taking. My intentions are quite clear to everyone.

As long as you're not misleading other drivers, where's the harm in that?

Twenty-odd years of motorcycling taught me the benefits of defensive techniques.

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The roundabout at the top of Church road must have the worst record for incorrect signalling. There's an incredible number of people who come up Church road, signal left in to Greenfield Place and drive straight on up Knab road. Then there's the same happens with traffic coming from Annesbrae place without signalling, all the traffic coming up Church road gives way to let them through the roundabout then they turn left down Church road.

 

The only reason there's not more accidents there must be down to the fact that everybody knows that the one direction a car will not be going is the direction they are indicating to go!

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