Jump to content

What are you currently reading?


Recommended Posts

I'm reading Yesman by Danny Wallace, it's so funny.

I started reading it ages ago but I hate finishing books so I usually stop before I reach the end, I don't know why, I know it's annoying but it means I can still read it, I've still not finished The curious incident of the dog in the night either.

 

This is funny. I remember meeting a guy on the train who told me that he always reads the last page of a book first, just in case he dies before he finishes it. Suffice to say, I'm quite easily infuenced so every book I have read since has been ruined.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am currently reading Imperial Ambitions: Conversations on the Post-9/11 World, interviews with Noam Chomsky.

 

The best description I have heard of Chomsky is: see that wall (Points), you know all those people who tell you it is blue? Well, look at it, really, look. It's red!

 

I never know it I enjoy his books because they tend to make me quite angry. Though I have had a few glimmers of hope in this one, especially when he talks about the the people he meets.

 

I am also reading Javascript Unleashed, I Just Can't Put It Down!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Narrow dog to carcassonne" by Terry Darlington. Tale of man, wife and narrow dog (a whippet) taking a narrow boat from northern England to the south of France. The journey with the boat would be a fascinating read but some of the authors descriptions of Jim (the whippet) are really funny.

 

I have now ordered two copies from an online bookseller (not Amazon) to give to friends as Christmas presents.......one friend for the dog bits and one for the boating.

 

Shetland Library has a copy....except that I have it for a few days but certainly a fun book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is funny. I remember meeting a guy on the train who told me that he always reads the last page of a book first, just in case he dies before he finishes it. Suffice to say, I'm quite easily infuenced so every book I have read since has been ruined.

 

Aw no how can you do that? I couldn't, my friend used to but it spoils the whole book, then you have to plough through it knowing whats going to happen anyway! Its just that I hate knowing what is going to happen next.

 

The guy on the train sounds quite, well worried about death or obsessed with finishing books...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is funny. I remember meeting a guy on the train who told me that he always reads the last page of a book first, just in case he dies before he finishes it. Suffice to say, I'm quite easily infuenced so every book I have read since has been ruined.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/njugle/Twirly.gif,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle, preferably a malcolmsons caramel slab. Now. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is funny. I remember meeting a guy on the train who told me that he always reads the last page of a book first, just in case he dies before he finishes it. Suffice to say, I'm quite easily infuenced so every book I have read since has been ruined.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/njugle/Twirly.gif,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle,Send money and cakes to Njugle, preferably a malcolmsons caramel slab. Now. :P

 

Whit's dee address?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Whit's dee address?

 

Result! 8)

Either bring votive offerings to Njugles Water, or you can c/o them to the Scalloway Post Office. Let me know when you do as i dunna come doon the hill often and i couldna bear the thought o the cake spoiling.(Caramel Slab---putting the MMM! in Malcolmsons :D)

 

:? I spose i better admit to reading something eenoo then, for the sake of the thread, erm, Uriel's Machine by Knight & Lomas. Historical stuff. You probably wouldn't like it. :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I have finished Thud! by Terry prcatchett (lighthearted fiction with a deeper social message, believe it or not. The mans a hunmorist genius and keeps getting better. having met hi several times hes also a really good guy, not up his ass like you'd expect from some writers) and am rereading Crusader Cross by James Lee Burke in anticipation of getting his new one (Pegasus Rising?) from Amazon. As a recovering salcoholic myself, i can attest that this man describes alcoholism a nd its demons like few i have ever read. He paints pictures with his prose and to anyone who has never read him, please, please please give hjis many books a try. (same for Pratchett. "Good Omens" with Neil Gaiman is one of the funniest books i have ever read, the child that i am!) While i mention him, Neil Gaimans "Nancy Boy"s is a great book as is its forerunner "American Gods (which you dont have to have read to enjoy N.B.)

 

I love reading and have the annoying (to my wife!) habbit of reading several at once, and about four a week (I'd read more of i had the time).

 

I have notes the names of all the books mentioned that i havent read and will have a go at each and every one. Thanks for teh recommendations.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the most fascinating books i have ever read has to be "Born in Blood". Its a history of the Freemasons and examines their origins and is NOT a conspiracist book but should probably be on every conspiracists book shelf due to some of the stuff about the Knights of Malta and teh Palazzo di Malta. Written by a scholar, John J Robinson, who has nio connection to them other than some friends whoo prompted him to debunk all the Egyptina origins crap. Damn good read. Surprsisingly, despitev him debvunking many of teh ghrander claims of the masonic mystreries, the book has been incredibly well received by the Lodges and the American governing body has gone so far as to accept much of the history he details. His research was obviously enormous and unlike so many others... he can back it up!!! But where he differs is that ewhen he makes an edcuated guess or his argumenmt is not so strong, he tells you that. He doesnt just dress it up and pass it off as ironclad fact like SOME have chosen to do.

 

The man is a scholar not a publicist and teh book has been around for a while now. Give it a try. I havent seen a bad review of it yet, and as a non Mason I found it fascinating. My father, who was of the Holy Royal Arch, loved the book and was the one who actually gave it to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Steve Earle: The Life and Near Death of...". Was the last book I finished. Excellent. Brilliant.

 

He got sooooo sooooo mess up in the early 90's. Virtually a homeless crack/heroin junkie living out of crack dens. But amazing he has come back for the dark side to produce some of his best material. He is soo consistent!!

 

 

Currently doing some lite reading of "Teaching as a Subversive Activity" (Neil Postman & Charles Weingartner).

 

Opens with:

 

"What did you learn in school today,

Dear little boy of mine?

What did you learn in school today,

Dear little boy of mine?

I learned that Washington never told a lie,

I learned that that soldiers seldom die,

I learned that everyone's free,

Thats what the teacher said to me

And thats what I learned in school today,

Thats what i learned in school" :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just read 'Map of Bones' by James Rollins.

 

A bit of Da Vinci Code, Clive Cussler, suspense, action, pseudo scientific ideas and the fight for good over evil... And all in the one book!

 

It wasn't bad for escapism. I must admit I'm wondering how many other twists on conspiracy theories associated with the ancient world and the catholic church people are going to be able to turn out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder what time of day people read? I generally confine my reading to as I go to bed and any break while I am working, I don't read in the late afternoon / early evening.

 

 

My Break-time reading

 

"An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory"

- Andrew Bennett and Nicholas Royle

 

It is surprisingly accessible in defiance of the title, a good Quote from the chapter titled 'Me':

"Psychoanalysis demonstrates how the 'arrogance' of anthropocentrism - every kind of thought that puts the human at the centre of the earth and solar system if not the universe - is both unwarranted and unsustainable"

 

It was written before I was born and yet is so apt when attached to climate change.

 

 

My Bed-time reading

 

"How the other half dies"

- Susan George

 

Does it really need an explanation? Susan George participated in a Transnational Institute project which produced a report called World Hunger: Causes and Remedies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...