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recycling (kerbside waste collection)


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I think that the problem here is that some people have to narrow a view on what constitutes "recycling".   The community skips (when they weren't being abused by small building contractors and people

I have always believed in recycling. Growing up, in the Midlands, most people were into the oldest form of recycling- scrap metal. There was also the bottle deposits, take a pop bottle back and you go

I think most houses will just be putting all waste in the black bag regardless of what it's made out of.   The best recycling was the local auction which the council refused to help in recent years.  

@mikeyboy - Nope, but I'm sure if you phone them up they'll tell you the same (Unless, of course, they're making it up as they go along).

You might also care to ask them if they've appointed a contractor yet who is willing to buy Shetland's recycling material because last month they still hadn't got one.  

Edited by Suffererof1crankymofo
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Perhaps a company could buy the recycling material and burn it in an incinerator to produce heat for a district heating system.. :-)

 

Or maybe an Anaerobic Digestion system to turn it into gas to burn to produce heat for a district heating system..

Or perhaps a Plasma Gasification system to produce heat..
 

Edited by Nigel Bridgman-Elliot
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@mikeyboy - Nope, but I'm sure if you phone them up they'll tell you the same (Unless, of course, they're making it up as they go along).

 

You might also care to ask them if they've appointed a contractor yet who is willing to buy Shetland's recycling material because last month they still hadn't got one.  

 

 

I have contacted "them" and have got a slightly different answer.

Possibly a miscommunication.

All waste that is recyclable and collected for recycling is recycled.

The 23% mentioned is perhaps referring to the expected percentage recycled of all waste which is 17-23%.

Processors are in place to receive almost all the waste with just one contract to finalise.

Edited by mikeyboy
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@mikeyboy - I don't believe it was a miscommunication.  Many people don't realise that what they put out as recycleable rubbish doesn't get recycled.  For example, even though Coca-Cola are stating that their bottles are 100% recycleable in reality, they are not:  the lids and labels aren't.  If you have, for example, a cardboard box; the cardboard if non-laminated can be recycled but a shiny label on it can't be.  That's before you even start getting into the different types of plastics and food containers, etc.  

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Having just read the new leaflet, why can’t SIC do anything properly from the onset ?

 

Over half of the plastic that could be recycled SIC don’t except, so I will have to have my own mini recycling centre to split different plastics. Why can’t SIC recycle all the recyclable plastic like other areas?

 

All my glass waste I have to dispose of myself. Why can’t the Council pick up the glass from households?

 

I also now have to wash all my waste.

 

I take it there will be a reduction in Council tax for us doing their job- No don’t think so.

 

But they still get paid the same, except we’re doing all the work.

 

I am all for recycling, when a system can be introduced so it can be achieved easily and properly by all, now for those who cannot move the wheelie bins eg elderly and disabled someone going to get paid to put out wheelie bins for them, where’s that money coming from,or is our Council tax going up to cover that cost?

 

Having lived on mainland where we recycled most of our rubbish the system worked well, another half baked idea from SIC just to make it look as though they are doing something when actually in reality it’s an utter joke.

Edited by wotsit
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Council would do better if they invested in a method to be able to recycle all recyclable plastics together instead of playing at it to tick few boxes wasting people time doing their job.

 

Taking packing tape etc off cardboard boxes, Xmas wrapping paper etc do you have take all sellotape off? come on, down south it just went all into a wheelie bin for cardboard and paper, whose got time to do this ?

 

Does the council now have to employ somebody in their stores department to remove all the packing tape and plastic document labels and envelopes, or are they exempt because it’s commercial waste, do as I say not as I do, springs to mind. If I’m wrong I stand corrected.

 

None of the supermarket packaging can go for recycling unlike on the mainland because it’s the wrong recyclable plastic for SIC, which is majority of people’s plastic waste. Just a few milk and juice cartons is hardly worth it so they can tick a box. Like I say if your going to do something do it properly.

Edited by wotsit
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  • 1 month later...

 

^ Kerbside waste collection is not a stand alone subject that can be addressed in isolation unless in a few minor specifics, its only one small component and inextricably part of the whole waste disposal system.

 

Material that previously found its way in to skips, the saleroom etc still needs to go someplace, and that someplace for a lot of it is now the kerbside collection of other domestic waste.

 

The volume and material content of kerbside waste, which has been affected by the failure of the Council to support initiatives such as the skips and saleroom, dictates what methods and policies they employ for waste disposal. So how we are told we are supposed to present our waste before the Council will accept it, is directly related to our choices, or lack of them, of places to dispose of items/materials we no longer need/want.

 

Regardless of anything else, what goes in the essy kert and how is also dictated by the design of the essy kert itself, the job description(s) of its crew, and what facilities/plans exist for the waste that comes out of it again at the end of each day.

 

 

 

You have already made these points on two other threads and have made very little effort to answer the OP questions.

Also the idea that most/best recycling was done through a auction room is laughable. Have you got any figures to back that up?

There are other options available for recycling decent goods. This place for one, Cope and the various Facebook Shetland classified pages.

These other possibilities for disposing of still usable goods are indeed useful options but have certain limitations that the auction didn't. For instance COPE refuse far more items now than they used to as they do very little, if any refurbishment on furniture due to changes in the way they are run. I know this from trying to donate an item within the last few years that needed a very small amount of fixing (I'm afraid I'm not at all handy) but it was refused on that basis. I have heard from others since that they have had the same issue. As I worked there several years ago before the operational changes & part of my job was to organise what was collected, I can say for sure that very few items used to be refused then. Not everyone uses the internet in their home as yet & maybe for various reasons people do not want or feel able to get involved in the direct selling that it would entail anyway. Sometimes a whole house clearance needs to be done quickly, possibly because of a death for instance & this is where having an auction room was particularly useful. Without one now inevitably a lot of items that wouldn't have before, will go straight to the dump because of time constraints & COPE has not got room enough to take a complete household of stuff at short notice. I used the auction & have always & still use the charity shops regularly. They are (& were) a blessing to people on lower incomes. They are also recycling at it's very best as the smallest to the largest items are getting reused with minimal carbon footprint. Please do not make the assumption (this is directed at everybody & anybody) that if a person is having difficulties with the way this recycling is apparently to be run that the said person must be the problem. I'm sure most of us are in favour of a workable scheme that is not actually creating more environmental issues, we just don't necessarily think this one is it. It is sad & very hypocritical of the council to not have supported a local business (as was the auction)that was helping significantly in the war against waste & pollution & then to put in place this scheme with so many problems that could have & should have been forseen. If the lay out of where you live is suitable & sheltered enough for whichever type of bins you have been provided with then I really am genuinely pleased for you but this is not the case for many of us.

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In answer to a question Mikeyboy in your post on the 13th of June, the uptake of people selling on Facebook & the like had absolutely nothing to do with the closure of the auction room. It was purely because of the lack of premises. The last place used, the old Central school gym hall was only rented on a temporary basis as it was already earmarked for development by Hjaltland. They were basically forced out of the previous premises where the auction had been held for many years (20+). I cannot remember the ins & outs of that situation. I was told all this by the owner of the auction himself who also told me that he contacted every councillor about the impending lack of premises & was scunnered that only two of them got back to him (after sometime).While I appreciate it was a privately owned business it did provide a very useful public service that can't be totally replicated by the other methods of "disposing" of unwanted/unneeded goods for the reasons I've already mentioned in my previous post. As you may remember prior to the internets existance just about the whole of a page of the Shetland Times was full of for sales ads every week & the auctions were more frequent then than they generally were in latter years. Nowadays we have (again in general) become a more than ever before, consumerist society so we need as many outlets as possible for all types of wares to be reused.

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