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Shetland windfarm - Viking Energy


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^ That will go down in history as your statement of the year SP !! :roll:

 

So what is wrong with that?

 

There are systems that can put out fires, isolate and lock off without anyone there, and folk seem to think that the existing turbines in Shetland are too small to have a comparison made.

 

those systems generally deal with fuel fed fires where they can cut the supply of fuel or then they are used in an enclosed space where they can cut the supply of oxygen neither of these scenarios apply to a wind turbine that has caught fire due to friction. you display a complete and utter lack of understanding for the things you write peat.

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I think what I was trying to show is that it can happen.

 

Cars break down, planes fall out of the sky, ferries sink, cargo vessels snap in two, nuclear plants meltdown, the list is endless. No engineering solution is infallible, any manner of things can go wrong. Anybody claiming that a whole concept is flawed when a small percentage of parts break is stretching the argument a bit.

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the permien extinction put a turdload of carbon into the ground right around the world that is now being realised as shale gas deposits, so we are not going to run out anytime soon. And now the european governments have cottoned on to just how much is underneath their feet they are showing little appetite for kyoto or any of the other sprootle they tried to feed us before the penny dropped. They are still trying to tax us to the hilt though as someone has to pay for their chauffeur driven limos and first class flights

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^ That will go down in history as your statement of the year SP !! :roll:

 

So what is wrong with that?

 

There are systems that can put out fires, isolate and lock off without anyone there, and folk seem to think that the existing turbines in Shetland are too small to have a comparison made.

 

those systems generally deal with fuel fed fires where they can cut the supply of fuel or then they are used in an enclosed space where they can cut the supply of oxygen neither of these scenarios apply to a wind turbine that has caught fire due to friction. you display a complete and utter lack of understanding for the things you write peat.

 

Take a look at Page 3.

 

http://www.sppowersystems.co.uk/safety/pdf/Emergency.pdf

 

I have worked with CO2 systems in substations for quite a number of years.

 

This type will quench the fire in any ancillary building.

 

You would only need to run a pipe with a low melting point around equipment to provide a more local extinguisher.

 

During high winds the turbines are shut down and locked off.

 

There are around 13 or 15 wind turbines in the farm above Ardrossan. They were all off today because of the high winds, so something has obviously shorted out and gone on fire.

 

http://news.stv.tv/scotland/west-central/286170-wind-turbine-bursts-into-flames-as-hurricane-force-winds-hit-scotland/

 

You have to be a bit of a fool to think they would run these machines in high winds.

In many ways, wind turbines are the natural evolution of

traditional windmills, but now typically have three blades,

which rotate around a horizontal hub at the top of a steel

tower. Most wind turbines start generating electricity at

wind speeds of around 3-4 metres per second (m/s),

(8 miles per hour); generate maximum ‘rated’ power at

around 15 m/s (30mph); and shut down to prevent

storm damage at 25 m/s or above (50mph).

 

http://www.bwea.com/pdf/briefings/technology-2005.pdf

 

 

Instead of attempting to protect the nacelle as a whole, Firetrace systems protect the most critical areas of this application, which are most prone to fire with smaller individual systems. These areas will vary by model and manufacturer, but typically the following areas should be considered:

 

Electrical enclosures – in the nacelle, near generators, in the tower base, and any adjacent cabinets related to controls or electrical transmission.

Braking systems

Generator enclosures

SCADA systems

Hydraulic systems with potential to rupture near points of ignition

 

Firetrace systems can be mounted unobtrusively so that maintenance activities in the turbines tight spaces are not affected.

 

Firetrace systems utilize the proprietary red Firetrace Detection Tubing (FDT) to detect the fire and activate the system to suppress the fire, making them complete, self-contained, pneumatic, fire protection that requires virtually no maintenance.

 

So, there are ways, similar to that used in sports cars that fire suppression can be installed, and as witnessed, the fire did not seem to last that long.

 

The CO2 systems would guard the ancillary equipment.

 

If you read the Firetrace document, it tells you that turbines are not atmospherically sealed so your saying that these systems are for enclosed areas only are somewhat dated, oh, under the bonnet of a car is not an enclosed space when there is a great big hole in the bottom of the engine bay and front grill.

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I did not say atmospherically sealed I said enclosed, and the engine bay of a sports car is enclosed.

a short circuit is not the most probable cause of a fire in a wind turbine during high wind conditions but a failure of the braking system is.

high winds will feed the fire with oxygen and disperse any co2 used as a extinguisher.

 

the fire did not last long because the fuel was burnt very quickly due to the wind feeding the fire, the turbine was completely destroyed.

google is great for getting irrelevant info pity it cant give you the wit to understand it exactly that irrelevent

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2 out of 3,421. I'd say that's pretty impressive!

 

Come on guys, lets have a bit of perspective here.

 

Don't forget, wind is a relatively new thing - at least for most of those 3421 machines. The damaged turbines may even be under warranty. However, as time passes there will be more windy nights, and a few years from now, or whenever the next hurricane hits the highlands, there will be a higher percentage of problems. What is the design life of the VE turbines? Was it 25 years?

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During high winds the turbines are shut down and locked off.

 

There are around 13 or 15 wind turbines in the farm above Ardrossan. They were all off today because of the high winds, so something has obviously shorted out and gone on fire.

 

 

It does not seem obvious to me that an electrical fault is the cause of the fire. I immediately thought that this would have been caused by insufficient braking - brakes try to stop it turning, wind is too strong, rotate rotate rotate, brakes are still on, friction, fire. But I suppose time will tell who is correct.

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The blades can be feathered, similar to an old ATP prop, the blades are adjusted to offer little wind resistance.

There is electricity in the unit, some require exciter coils to start the generation process, there is all the monitoring equipment, you need power to turn the head. So yes, there is power in the unit, it is a little more complicated than a dynamo on a Claude Butler or a wee man winding up a bucket on a well.

 

Still, when the planning is due, I am sure folks will bring this up. Although it is a tiny percentage of the UKs turbines that had problems, it may be even less if you factor in all the times they did not have a problem.

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I think what I was trying to show is that it can happen.

 

Cars break down, planes fall out of the sky, ferries sink, cargo vessels snap in two, nuclear plants meltdown, the list is endless. No engineering solution is infallible, any manner of things can go wrong. Anybody claiming that a whole concept is flawed when a small percentage of parts break is stretching the argument a bit.

 

Yes, but they didn't gamble "every last penny" of Shetland's money......

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I think what I was trying to show is that it can happen.

 

Cars break down, planes fall out of the sky, ferries sink, cargo vessels snap in two, nuclear plants meltdown, the list is endless. No engineering solution is infallible, any manner of things can go wrong. Anybody claiming that a whole concept is flawed when a small percentage of parts break is stretching the argument a bit.

 

Yes, but they didn't gamble "every last penny" of Shetland's money......

 

I'm pretty sure they'll have insurance to cover such things.

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