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Shetland windfarm - Viking Energy


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The term "raptor" is derived from the Latin word rapere (meaning to seize or take by force)

 

18 species of raptor seen in Unst since this blog began in 2010

 

http://robbiesnorthernexposures.blogspot.co.uk/2011/12/rapturous-years.html

 

Sparrowhawk, Merlin, Kestrel, Peregrine, Hobby, Common Buzzard, Snowy Owl, Sea Eagle, Honey Buzzard, Rough legged Buzzard, Goshawk, Black Kite, Osprey, Marsh Harrier, Pallid Harrier, Hen Harrier, Long eared owl, Short eared owl, Gyr falcon.

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I think they should build some on bressay i hear a certain dr wills is rather keen on them.One above his house on the ward o bressay would look rather nice im sure the tourists arriving on da sooth boat would really like it and it would prove shetlands green credentials.

 

Too close to Noss.

 

Shetland fishermen agreed nearly 10 years ago to land any marine litter that came aboard their boats

 

http://www.savethenorthsea.com/sa/node.asp?node=1381

 

The articles mentioned this. It is a shame others will not stop discarding it. The journey of the outwashed debris of the Tsunami is turning up on coastlines, as well as the wee bath ducks.

 

 

 

18 species of raptor seen in Unst since this blog began in 2010

 

http://robbiesnorthernexposures.blogspot.co.uk/2011/12/rapturous-years.html

 

Sparrowhawk, Gyr falcon.

 

Has anyone been counting them around the VE site?

 

One thing also no note is these large projects sometimes enhance species as they become protected by the infrastructure and the security measures.

The quarries could produce other habitats if managed.

 

This is where folk will have to keep pressure up on their councillors. The ones put on planning will not be able to enter into any debate before any hearings, the folk who are publicly voicing an opinion as candidates should not be put on. They have already voiced their intentions and would not be able to sit on the committee. They are shooting themselves in the foot. The ones that understand this will be the existing councillors and of course those who have not voiced an opinion but have said they will do what is the best.

Folk need to write to their councillors, but keep in mind other plans. If the project is approved, councillors not on committee can have quite a say in the conditions that are put on VE. Also though, they have to be measured against actually being able, and not to prevent the construction or cause ransom conditions. The ransom conditions would be one where to gain access, they would need to use someones land and then could be denied access.

To object, you would need to use objections that would fit with the planning laws and other conditions. Otherwise you would be wasting your time.

The other plans, if VE was approved would be the management of the area, the conservation projects, the initial payments to the communities and folk who could be blighted by the construction and its operation.

 

The planning has to be right, VE will appeal, and if there is reason to uphold the appeal, it will cost the tax payers, not just those in Shetland, but all taxpayers in Scotland.

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There's info in the public domain though on interconnector cables getting snagged and damaged, resulting in them being unable to be used to full capacity and hence output from the windfarm that supplies it being cut back dramatically. :twisted:

 

I don't know how the oil and gas industry gets by?

 

http://www.shetlandtimes.co.uk/2012/04/09/huge-pipe-layer-begins-work-at-firths-voe

 

As folk were quick to point out, there is about 33% spare capacity.

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There's info in the public domain though on interconnector cables getting snagged and damaged, resulting in them being unable to be used to full capacity and hence output from the windfarm that supplies it being cut back dramatically. :twisted:

 

I don't know how the oil and gas industry gets by?

 

http://www.shetlandtimes.co.uk/2012/04/09/huge-pipe-layer-begins-work-at-firths-voe

 

As folk were quick to point out, there is about 33% spare capacity.

 

Oh, I'm sure some peeps with more knowledge than I will care to fill you in SP, with the fatal incidents that have occurred in the past. Whilst the oil and gas industry may well provide detailed maps of where such pipes are laid, sometimes vessels do stray too close, be it through GPS/technical failure, the sheer force of the sea or human error/whatever.

 

The fact, however, remains, that over 70% of insurance claims relating to windfarms are to do with problems with the interconnectors.

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  • admin changed the title to Shetland windfarm - Viking Energy

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