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Shetland windfarm - Viking Energy


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The fact, however, remains, that over 70% of insurance claims relating to windfarms are to do with problems with the interconnectors.

 

So they get fixed then. Should I then not own a car because someone my damage it?

 

 

Could you not find that on google peat?

 

I was not going to waste my time looking, though, there is quite a difference in risk factors. I have not wasted my time looking on how this would be for a rupture of any degree of oil pipes. I would understand why the oil industry spend that little extra. Imagine the ramifications if they did not, compared to a cable strike.

 

Now I have just wasted my time, I think, according to this report, Wind Turbines could get a boost as far as safety alone.

 

Total’s Elgin leak occurred above the water line on the rig itself, the auditor noted.

 

“There are all kinds of safety mechanisms that should kick in and prevent a leak at that height … Quite clearly these fail-safes did not work,†he said.

 

 

http://royaldutchshellplc.com/2012/04/08/safety-check-backlog-at-uk-oil-rigs/

 

I have not found it, I was sure I read that another rig continued to feed the leak for a wee while. Although standby vessels are used as guardians of the tube ways, there seems to be concerns that will benefit renewables as a whole and make George Osbournes "dash for gas" lame.

 

It also seems the 200 tonne leak from a pipeline recently will naturally disperse. Lucky really, another pipe rupture. All this goes to support claims for an alternative energy source.

 

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/north-sea-spills-on-the-rise-7627548.html

 

Thanks for letting me know though, does save wasting time.

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The fact, however, remains, that over 70% of insurance claims relating to windfarms are to do with problems with the interconnectors.

 

So they get fixed then. Should I then not own a car because someone my damage it?

 

Of course they get fixed but you appear, as always, to be missing the point. When they are down then obviously profits are affected. In addition, what are the insurance premiums likely to be? Will the insurance premiums go up if (and yes, it is an if) the interconnector gets damaged? Has this been factored into the VE costings?

 

No doubt you'll correct me if I'm wrong, but haven't you expressed more than once on this forum that you are not a car owner? If so, then isn't your comment irrelevant? However, would you use a cab company if the cars kept breaking down? In other words, how will the companies that may or may not purchase the lekky that gets delivered via the interconnector feel if it does break down on more than one occasion? Go elsewhere perhaps?

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From Kavi :- And yes, how much concrete for just one base.......

 

With a bit of luck Peat will be working on it and we will know in due course !

 

On the other hand VE are maybe planning on using Liquid Granite along with the recycled material from the decommissioning of oil rigs. :- http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091029161253.htm

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^ And isn't this the same lekky company that said they couldn't put cables underground due to technical difficulties with cement sinking (That was the excuse given to me on the telephone)? Amazing how they are going to be able to do it now though eh?

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So, will it stop it being built? I like to see that argument put to planning.

 

I cannot see any relevance.

 

The insurance claims will pay for down time, so payments will still be made, it may pave the way for more stringent safety devices to be installed when laying cables by any insurer. If cables are correctly marked and surveyed for drifting then it is the person who hits it who is at fault. Insurance companies are known for making the victim pay more in premiums due to their "risk". They have done so in the past.

 

 

Me owning a car or not does not render my opinions irrelevant as you have judged.

 

Shetland should not have a wind farm because a cable may get damaged?

 

Sell it! Perhaps on Ebay...

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Me thinks you'd have no takers on eBay given who owns the site.

 

Do you seriously think that an Insurer would continue to insure IF the cable got damaged on several occasions? Okay, so I'm playing devil's advocate but it is precisely such scenarios that should be considered and take into account.

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I wonder if this windmill saga is the real reason that the spring water bottling plant plan in weisdale was dropped after they realised they were going to build all these roads and windmills right above the plant.After all the owners were bound to object like crazy

 

The windmill proposal had nothing to do with it. It folded due to a big drop in demand for water from corporate customers plus the need to invest much more to meet goverment standards.

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From Kavi :- And yes, how much concrete for just one base.......

 

With a bit of luck Peat will be working on it and we will know in due course !

 

On the other hand VE are maybe planning on using Liquid Granite along with the recycled material from the decommissioning of oil rigs. :- http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091029161253.htm

 

Without wasting any time an 80 m tower, with blades on top you may need, off the top of my head, a guess at 26 tonnes of steel and 190 cu M of concrete, it would give a diameter of, erm, about 15 M.

 

I like the idea of liquid granite.

 

If folk want to oppose this, they should, but use facts that relate to the application. If the risk management satisfies all the authorities then it will be difficult to oppose. As an objector, you too would need to prove that your objections will be proven on that project, it could cost quite a bit. It will cost. You would need to mirror all the surveys with your own from non-biased sources.

 

There will be some employment benefits and ongoing ones at that. The site at Whitelee Farm has been enhanced by an education centre and other pursuits. Developers, planners and councils are learning to make the most of what they have and the future potential of such sites.

 

The Norwegians have been talking about links with the UK as far as power is concerned, there has also been talks of the OIL Rig Grid. With an interconnection, of suitable size it could be possible to route it through Shetland.

 

There are many options that are in favour. One that could also be a benefit is becoming a centre of excellence within this field (no pun intended) and educate more of Shetlands young and keep them on the islands.

 

There will be many benefits on offer, folk who want to get involved will have to prove that the -VEs outweigh the +VEs (that was a pun :wink: )

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^ And the Norwegians already have an interconnector that is giving them grief!

 

Well, I couldn't help myself ... I've just telephoned Whitelee and asked the following:-

 

How much profit does the windfarm generate for the company and the kW output? (Don't know)

 

How much without subsidies? (Don't know)

 

Amount of subsidies? (Don't know)

 

How long did it take to build and was it on schedule? Answer: Took 3 years to build, "as far as I know on time". The extension of 75 turbines will take 18 months.

 

How many jobs went to locals? (Don't know but 300 worked in construction)

 

How often is there downtime? (Don't know)

 

Then got passed over to someone else. Apparently these are too much of a probing nature and they are not given this type of information. Oh, and apparently not happy if this info going on a forum. Given number of Marketing person at the energy company concerned - not there (hardly surprising given it is a bank holiday).

 

Apparently, the purpose of the visiting centre is just so that folk can have a pleasant day and look around. Now I was polite and given that I know that the subsidies figures are available elsewhere, why does the visiting centre feel it is too probing a question? Is it that an education centre is just there for "happy, positive" questions?

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They must like the grief as they are planning more.

 

I am sure they have learnt by their mistakes.

 

On a note, if the Norwegians were to oversee the oil fields on the British side, it would less damaging to the environment, compared to the British, they have had a small proportion of leaks. So with that in mind, the next generation of interconnections will be less troublesome.

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Around 2000/2500 tons for the bases, then you have to have the base to sit the bloody big crane on and it'e accompanying slip road, add another 1000tons This is of course per turbine

Don't forget the tens of thousands of gallons of oil these turbines will contain.

 

If memory serves, i believe the cranes are to be erected on site and then dismantled after.

 

Also if the wind is above 25 knots (?) no work can go ahead as regards the cranes.

 

There should'nt ne any work during bird breeding season, but Manson was on about doing test pits in the summer :wink:

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The infrastructure will be quite astounding. As well as concrete plants, there will be the haulage and the cranes. To raise the turbine mechanisms to that hight will of course require oversized cranes. There are mobile ones, as mentioned before that will lift 600 tonnes, but at a 100 metres, NO. I use a Hiab it can lift 5 tonnes, but at its maximum reach of 16 metres only 250kg.

 

Work should not be carried out in breeding areas during breeding times. That even goes for hedge trimming.

 

Of course, this will generate jobs during the installation phase, another thing needed to be carefully weighed against any bad impact.

 

I am looking forward to the debate proper. It will be a testing time for all. I am not so sure about the hate that seems to go with it, perhaps that will pass. It seems to perpetuate sometimes. What ever is the outcome, the plan "b"s will need to swing into action as well as any protest. If it goes against what you think should happen, it would be prudent then to work with it and make the best out of it. No point going off in a huff never to have anything to do with it bar gripe till you die. Not a good life.

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The cost would have to be the worry of those delegated to make those choices as far as public money is concerned and of course part of the business plan, which will have no influence on planning. It is a difficult argument in planning to suggest that things should not be passed because folk think it is a wast of money, even though it is partly tax payers cash. That is another committee for folk to attend and be fully versed with.

 

I have been attending planning meetings for years and have often wondered about the levels of training members get with planning. With new regulations coming out, and the huge costs to councils with appeals, training does seem to be of more importance. I have heard some ridiculous arguments that serve no purpose except to get that members name on the minutes, I sometimes think it is political, which goes against the goals of Planning.

 

I would, if you are concerned express your views about members skills in Planning, and any other committee. As we have seen, some bad choices cost money, a Brig too Far?

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