Jump to content

Shetland windfarm - Viking Energy


trout
 Share

Recommended Posts

 

 

 

• The results of the internet survey suggest that the average tourist is prepared to pay around 20-25 per cent more for a room with an unspoilt room than they are for a room with a view of a wind farm.

 

If this is remotely true then the same will surely apply to property selection.

VE has denied that the development will affect property prices in areas close to the turbines - more miss information?

How close do the VE directors live to their development ??.

 

Also, Scotlalnd is a large place . The tourist can choose an area where there are no turbines. He can drive 10 miles in any direction and escape them. Compared to Scotland the VE development covers a large percentage of the Shetland mainland and will be visible pretty well from everywhere.

There is a difference between having a wind farm on Shetland, as we do now, and turning Shetland INTO a wind farm.

One of the main tourist draws for Shetland is the open, unspoilt natural environment. If this goes, a lot of tourists will go with it. I do not believe that a new species of 'turbine hugger' is going to evolve, and given the high cost of a holiday in Shetland the presence of the proposed wind farm is going to tip the balance against for many.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"development in the Highlands and Islands was being hindered by large national organisations backed by their expensive lawyers"... Sandy Cluness as reprted in the Sheland Times.

 

"Derek is a crofting law specialist accredited by the Law Society of Scotland".... Extract from VE advert in the same Shetland Times referring to Derek Flynn. (hired by VE with community money? We should be told)

 

Here's a gun, here's my foot - BANG!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The report ‘The Economic Impacts of Wind Farms on Scottish Tourism’ was undertaken by the Glasgow Caledonian University. The research was commissioned in June 2007 to assess whether Scottish Government priorities for wind farms in Scotland are likely to have an economic impact – either positive or negative - on Scottish tourism.

 

The report looked into four areas of Scotland: ‘Stirling, Perth & Kinross’, ‘Caithness & Sutherland’, ‘Dumfries & Galloway’ and ‘Scottish Borders’. The findings of the report include:

 

• The results confirm that a significant minority (20% to 30%) of tourists preferred landscapes without wind farms.

 

• A much higher percentage of respondents indicated that they would not visit an area if a wind farm was constructed (17.8%).

 

• Most individuals appear to prefer a landscape from their accommodation without a wind farm (68%) but there is also a substantial proportion that is neutral (28%) and a few who positively like wind farms (9%).

 

• The results of the internet survey suggest that the average tourist is prepared to pay around 20-25 per cent more for a room with an unspoilt room than they are for a room with a view of a wind farm.

 

Classic example of "cherry picking" by Mutton here am afraid folks.

 

To read the full Research Findings please go to

 

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/214905/0057315.pdf

 

Also, if anyone feels inclined to read the 308 page report please go to

 

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/214910/0057316.pdf

 

My own view on the findings are that in the main the survey suggests that if windfarms are built sensitively, then there should be no real reason for them to have an economic impact on the surrounding area.

 

It also suggests that larger developments, rather than several smaller ones, would be preferable, "particularly when they occur in the same general area". I fully agree! :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please read the report and draw your own conclusions.

When doing surveys with questionnaires you can often get the ansewr you want by the questions you ask.

Look at where windfarms come on questionnaire - below pylons and then look at the list of replies!!

it looks like someone wanted an answer and asked/tailored the questions to fit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why are people so worried about the visual impact? What about all the unsightly fish farms we have had to suffer over the years and the associated environmental issues from those? Disease, lice, illegal killing of seals, otters etc

 

Nobody is going to be living THAT close to the aerogenerators - most of them are to be sited up in the hills, after all. The main problem to be concentrated on is the impact on the environment, birds, wildlife, heather etc and I believe that there are strict government directives in place to ensure that this is minimized in exactly the same way that this is, as well as being an extremely profitable venture, a government directive to all electricity providers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please read the report and draw your own conclusions.

 

Absolutely, read it and make your own minds up!

 

Look at where windfarms come on questionnaire - below pylons and then look at the list of replies!!

it looks like someone wanted an answer and asked/tailored the questions to fit.

 

Sorry, not sure exactly what you are getting at here eastender! Are you suggesting the Caledonia University have rigged this survey/report?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You have to remember that with any survey, as well as the questions potentially leading us to the "required" answer, the reception that the results get depends on how well they agree with our own views - nothing personal on this one, but there is always a tendency to believe that sensible people would always agree with "my" view if only they had all the information.

 

Opinion surveys give you more information, but it is sometimes hard to tell what the information IS ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You have to remember that with any survey, as well as the questions potentially leading us to the "required" answer, the reception that the results get depends on how well they agree with our own views - nothing personal on this one, but there is always a tendency to believe that sensible people would always agree with "my" view if only they had all the information.

 

Opinion surveys give you more information, but it is sometimes hard to tell what the information IS ;)

 

 

:lol:

Very true, Carlos!

 

If you look at the Herald and the Scotsman today they have two entirely different angles on the report!

 

It's just seems that when everyone is calling for surveys and reports, low and behold, as soon an independent report comes out folk are doubting its credibility. Some folk are never happy! :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

It also suggests that larger developments, rather than several smaller ones, would be preferable, "particularly when they occur in the same general area". I fully agree!

Except that we're facing both large and small. VE is not the only proposal on the table, there are definitely two and supposedly more lining up to utilise the interconnector once VE has justified it. Thin end of the wedge, only it's not thin, it starts rather steeply and grows from there. That is the bigger problem in every respect other than the public funding one. That is, the subsequent proposals are not going to draw from the CT, but still have the other aforementioned potential negative consequences.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Except that we're facing both large and small. VE is not the only proposal on the table, there are definitely two and supposedly more lining up to utilise the interconnector once VE has justified it. Thin end of the wedge, only it's not thin, it starts rather steeply and grows from there. That is the bigger problem in every respect other than the public funding one. That is, the subsequent proposals are not going to draw from the CT, but still have the other aforementioned potential negative consequences.

 

If that's the case Njugle then that would worry me! I have no problem with windfarms but part of the attraction of the VE project is that it is what it is. A large windfarm in the middle of, IMHO, a barren landscape!

 

If we are going to create a situation where there will be other windfarms springing up all over the place then that would concern me!

 

Obviously, I have no problem with the visual aspects of windfarms but if we're going to see various other projects popping up in areas which might be deemed less suitable(?) then I would be against such developments.

 

I'm going to look into this as I've heard similar concerns before and I've never heard anybody actually discount any such fear. If there's a 600MW cable and VE is not using the full capacity on the cable then there is obviously scope for other suppliers. I would hope it was alternative renewables though!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was a proposal from BT to put a few windmills on the hill at the south end with all the masts and dishes on it (I can never remember the name). They have a plan to offset all the power they use nationally with renewable energy, this would be part of that plan.

 

edit: I think it would be about the same size as the Burradale installation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sheesh that get's my hackles up, nice job AT. :wink:

You may think it is what ever size you want, that is no other than me saying that i think the VE scheme covers the whole mainland.:razz:

 

If you have paid full attention to this issue :wink: then you would know that there is one proposed for Mossy hill iirc, perhaps the BT one. There is another proposed, by the same firm as Burradale, south by Quarff somewhere and there is talk of another investigation into one above Tresta. There was also plans afoot to place one in Yell, although certain parties involved in VE rubbished the idea in that the most suitable site in Yell would be probably unsuitable on the grounds that it would be in the flightpath for Scatsta, which is clearly absurd, in comparison to Sumburgh Airport and Sumburgh Head.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Derek Flynn is THE Crofting Law Specialist, paid for by VE/SSE to provide advice to crofters during and after the series of ongoing meetings.

 

The decisions as to whether to lease the land is a matter for the landlords of the appropriate areas. If they decide to sign leases, then that's it.

 

The Kames is hardly an area of natural beauty - in fact wind turbines may give the tourists/general public something to look at for a change......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm hearing that roughly £2.3million is to be paid to 19 land owners each year with two making serious (hundres of thousands of pounds per year) money.

 

On top of this will be the roads, quarrying and disturbance payments.

 

This will be regardless of whether the wind blows, VE comes ahead financially or the government keep subsidising it.

 

Any crofts for sale in the North Mainland?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • admin changed the title to Shetland windfarm - Viking Energy

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...