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Some machines have processors in them that require to be reset and unless one has access to the necessary software even the simple jobs are impossible,a bit like the modern car even, changing brake discs can require a reset and a visit to the appropriate dealer.

 

The days of DIY for many things have gone.

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Some machines have processors in them that require to be reset and unless one has access to the necessary software even the simple jobs are impossible,a bit like the modern car even, changing brake discs can require a reset and a visit to the appropriate dealer.

 

The days of DIY for many things have gone.

Most appliances are sold in multiple countries and some of those countries have "right to repair" laws within some of it's Provence's l it's usually farm equipment, tablet's and cars that do this.

 

Under these laws it becomes legal to hack and reverse engineer for the sake of fixing a product you own, and there are legal consequences for voiding a warranty because an unauthorized mechanic changed a broken spring in a tractor the size of a house instead of towing it to annother town possible even having to use crane's trailers and ferries to get it there.

 

That being said so few people bother to fix washing machines that few would bother to give each circuit board a unique I'd number and lock it to that exact model off the assembly line and add the required lock's so you can usually just find a way to wipe the memory.

 

I recall a tumble dryer I know of having a replaceable heating element and trip switch just look up your model number

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If you repair any electrical appliance in your home and it should go on fire or cause water damage ect unless you can prove you are qualified to do those repairs ones insurance might be "null and void".

 

We are all being "forced" to hire qualified tradesmen or risk footing the cost of repairs ourselves if anything goes wrong.

 

Many if not all Insurance company's will not  entertain claims for work "gone wrong" being  undertaken by unqualified cowboys.

Edited by Urabug
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If you repair any electrical appliance in your home and it should go on fire or cause water damage ect unless you can prove you are qualified to do those repairs ones insurance might be "null and void".

 

We are all being "forced" to hire qualified tradesmen or risk footing the cost of repairs ourselves if anything goes wrong.

 

Many if not all Insurance company's will not  entertain claims for work "gone wrong" being  undertaken by unqualified cowboys.

This is reasonable for boilers and things that are bolted on and hardwired but Blenders, washing machines and computers not so much.

 

Although i do have applicable qualifications to install something into the plumbing and wire something up the key is to get the thing put together as it looked before you opened it.

The most likely new thing to burst into flames is actually some portable device that skimped on the safety features to make their Lithium ion battery smaller/longer lasting.

Tumble dryers because of their heating element are a risk factor and that's why most GOOD dryers have more metal and less plastic in the case than you would find in a similarly sized washer.

 

The issue you raise is more an issue of insurance than repair and an issue of personal use vs "business" use.

that's why everything has to have a PAT sticker saying it was checked for electrical safety,

you could if you wanted to hire somebody to use a machine and give your machine a sticker with their company name date and signature saying they checked it was "safe"

 

so you could fix it so long as you are competent at electronics and get the sticker after you have got it working,

so long as you don't need to crack it open again you should be fine though best to get the guy out when he is in the local area anyway as driving a few miles just to look at a plug will reasonably lead to a call out charge.

 

If they can find a way to get out of paying they will! end of story.

 

a bigger issue is that manufactures go out of their way to limit the number of people who can work on your machine either to make sure you hire their chosen guys or a matter of planned obsolescence and you buy a new one.

 

You can use generic parts when they don't supply spares and that is why computers have been configured to detect these so that only somebody with a special password can get your machine going again if a part is taken out to repair as is the wider issue of gatekeeping by manufacturers.

 

although i wouldn't worry about it too much in washing machines because the vibration affects more complicated circuitry in fact its well known that the clock inside does not count minuets the same as the same clock system if it were in a non vibrating case and that's why they just settle for "more or less" what 15 mins would be although this becomes less accurate over time so your odds of false positives being set off on untampered devices is too high a risk to do it

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Its only top end white goods that are worth repairing these days, the cheaper stuff is put together in such a way that taking it apart is a nightmare and putting it back together worse, and all too often rather pointless anyway. As all too often once one thing dies, its only a relatively short time before somthing else does, then something else...... They really are the ultimate in disposable appliances, just about every critical component is designed and engineered to have as near as dammit the same limited period lifespan, which isn't usually very long.

 

I guess its not surprising really, as if you go and get your cheap and cheerful Beko or similar for £199.99 or less, by the time you've accounted for retailer mark up, transport and middle men fees, you're probably lucky if £50 of what you paid was to cover the materials and labour to build it in the first place, and what can you expect to buy for £50 these days............

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