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lg18

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  1. Can anyone tell me: does putting "-lie" on the end of a word mean "-like"? So If "Maa" means gull does "Maalie" (fulmar) originally mean gull-like bird? If so, if "Aalie" is an animal (lamb) that is tame or being fattened does that mean that the tame/fat/pet lamb is LIKE an "Aa", and if so, what was an "Aa"? Presumably something else that was tame/fat? There are two Aa stacks on the west side of Yell, and 2 Aa skerries off Mainland (one S of Skeld, one off S Havera). So presumably an Aa was something that lived or hung out on stacks and skerries - does anyone know what? Thank you for any help! Lucy
  2. They put our bags through the machine when we got on in Lerwick 2 nights ago...
  3. Hello! I am interested in the extinct great auk and where it might have bred in Shetland and whether anyone here has any idea what it might have been called? The Norse name was geirfugl (or gare fowl in English, or pinguin in Welsh), and there are many coastal features called Fugla, Fogl, Foula etc, but I think this didn't specify any particular bird species (or maybe just "auk"?). Or does anyone have any idea of where great auks might have bred in Shetland? I have read that archaeological records suggest that great auks were probably already very rare by the time the Vikings arrived and re-named most things in Shetland and Orkney, so there may not be many (or any?) Norse named coastal features meaning great auk? However, could there still be some pre-Viking (Pictish) place names meaning great auk? Any contenders do you think? Pure speculation, but I did wonder whether "Aa" could possibly have once meant great auk? Three dubious arm-wavy reasons I am asking about "Aa": 1. There are 2 "Aastack"s on West Yell, both with the right sort of shape, size, steepness for great auks to clamber up and nest safely. There is also "The Aalie" a narrow ness on Uyea (NW Northmavine), and "Aa Skerries" near the mouth of Skelda Voe, W of Roe Ness (West Mainland), where great auks could easily have hauled out to rest, as skarfs and selkies do now. 2. Animal/bird names are often onomatopaeic, and written records describe the great auks cry as something like "aaa" (presumably a bit like razorbills and guillemots). (Other examples of onomatopaic bird names include "whaup", "peewit", "craa" etc). 3. A previous thread on here discussed that "aalie" meant a cossetted/tame/fattened-up animal. Great auks apparently appeared very tame, and were known to be very fatty (on Funk Island they used to boil them up for their oil), and were once a valuable food resource. Could there be a connection between great auk/Aa/Aalie? Related to this, I am interested to know whether putting "-lie" on the end of a word means "-like". If Maa means gull and Maalie means fulmar, is that because fulmars are "gull-like"? So if Aa meant great auk, which is tame and fat and good for eating, did Aalie originally mean "great-auk-like" because tha Aalie animal (lamb) is tame or being fattened up? I would love to hear your thoughts on great auks, possible breeding locations, or related place names! thanks, Lucy
  4. Just an update on my research doing tick surveys around Shetland and Orkney. By dragging my piece of blanket around on the ground in various locations in July, I found exactly NO TICKS! The very kind vet found only one tick for me, from a cat. To compare, when I use exactly the same method around Aberdeenshire, I almost always find several (sometimes many) ticks, virtually everywhere I look. I did the same thing in Orkney this summer too, and found ticks in only one of the sites I looked at (Rackwick, Hoy), whereas the kind vet in Kirkwall managed to find 6 ticks for me (from cats). So, the conclusion is: Shetland clearly does have ticks, but they are rare, and generally not a problem. Orkney has more ticks than Shetland, but they are still fairly uncommon. Aberdeenshire has loads, especially in the woodlands! Interestingly, as part of the same project, some colleagues surveyed Faroe and they found ticks at only one of their sites, too, on the furthest south island in a small community woodland. Many thanks to those of you who helped by replying to my post and giving valuable advice! Lucy
  5. Ah, thanks for realising that Peter, and thanks for the Hoy tip. Ticks and keds are rather similar, both equally revolting and easy to confuse. Ticks (Ixodes ricinus) are smooth and shiny and tear-drop shaped and are usually firmly attached to the sheep/dog, during which time they balloon up to a big grey blob (from the original flat, 2-tone orange and black). Keds have a longer more segmented brown body (they have a waist), thicker legs (and the legs are hairy) - they are actually a type of louse fly and not related to ticks at all. cheers, Lucy
  6. Thanks v much for the info about the Westside, ShetlandCars - where exactly do you get most of the ticks, and would you mind if I came along some time in July with my little white blanket to try to catch some? (I drag it on the ground and the ticks (hopefully) cling on). (I am near Skeld). Thanks also, TGS - are your sheep on the westside too (and whereabouts)? If you find any ticks, do shove one or 2 in the freezer for me if you have the time/energy/inclination! My email address is lucyDOTgilbertAThutton.ac.uk (as you may not want to post online where you stay!). I'm really grateful for all your input, Lucy
  7. Many many thanks everyone, that is incredibly useful (and I'm really sorry to hear about your poor caddy, Paulb - ticks are disgusting - I am only studying them by mistake and wish I wasn't!). Please keep records/places/ideas coming in. Oh, and if anyone does see a tick, I wonder if you could possibly keep it (just in a little bag/cling film/tiny pot/anything in the freezer) and I'll come and pick it up some time. (need positive species identification, as there are several species of tick possible). THANK YOU! Lucy
  8. Hello, (I also posted this on the agriculture/crofting section) I am interested in where ticks exist (or not), i.e. their environmental limits, and have studied them up hills in the Cairngorms and how far north or inland they are in Norway. But has anyone ever found a sheep tick anywhere in Shetland or Orkney, maybe on a sheep, pony, dog or yourself? And if so, whereabouts exactly? I know there are seabird ticks (Ixodes uriae) around the cliffs as I had one on me on Noss last summer, but I'm particularly interested in sheep ticks (Ixodes ricinus). I have a feeling there might be ticks on Orkney, although I'm not sure where (if anyone knows, please let me know!), but I've never heard of any in Shetland - have you? (or any incidences of tick-borne disease in sheep such as louping ill virus or tick-borne fever)? Any info would be brilliant, thanks very much, Lucy
  9. Hello, I am interested in where ticks exist (or not), i.e. their environmental limits, and have studied them up hills in the Cairngorms and how far north or inland they are in Norway. But has anyone ever found a sheep tick anywhere in Shetland or Orkney, maybe on a sheep, pony, dog or yourself? And if so, whereabouts exactly? I know there are seabird ticks (Ixodes uriae) around the cliffs as I had one on me on Noss last summer, but I'm particularly interested in sheep ticks (Ixodes ricinus). I have a feeling there might be ticks on Orkney, although I'm not sure where (if anyone knows, please let me know!), but I've never heard of any in Shetland - have you? (or any incidences of tick-borne disease in sheep such as louping ill virus or tick-borne fever)? Any info would be brilliant, thanks very much, Lucy
  10. I wouldn't mind watching it - what's its name, or do you have a link from Youtube?
  11. If you want to bag a hare, remember our mountain hares have a closed season - not allowed to shoot them in March, April, May, June or July.
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