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ArabiaTerra

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ArabiaTerra last won the day on December 31 2018

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About ArabiaTerra

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  1. It seems that reality has proven you wrong: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/dec/03/uruguay-makes-dramatic-shift-to-nearly-95-clean-energy
  2. There never was a theory that we were heading for another ice-age. That's just another zombie* denier lie. There were a couple of papers published that mentioned that we would be getting another ice-age in a few thousand years, which were picked up by the media and made the front page of a few magazines and newspapers. The vast majority of papers published in the 70's were warning of Global Warming. More here:- http://www.skepticalscience.com/ice-age-predictions-in-1970s.htm The millennium bug was not a problem because thousands of programmers spent millions of hours fixing everything be
  3. There never was a theory that we were heading for another ice-age. That's just another zombie* denier lie. There were a couple of papers published that mentioned that we would be getting another ice-age in a few thousand years, which were picked up by the media and made the front page of a few magazines and newspapers. The vast majority of papers published in the 70's were warning of Global Warming. More here:- http://www.skepticalscience.com/ice-age-predictions-in-1970s.htm The millennium bug was not a problem because thousands of programmers spent millions of hours fixing everything be
  4. Ask and ye shall receive:- http://www.skepticalscience.com/graphics/past_change_med.jpg Well, it's only 1000 years, but still... Edit: Here's the ice-core data:- http://www.southwestclimatechange.org/files/cc/figures/icecore_records.jpg This goes back 300,000 years. That enough for you?
  5. This is actually an interesting point. If you look at the temperature graph for the 20th C then you will see rising temps up until the 40's, the it flatlines until the 70's then begins a steep rise again which has continued to this day. The scientific consensus explaining this pause in warming is that it was caused by a massive increase in sulphur dioxide from burning coal which was reflecting solar radiation back into space. The end of this pause coincides with the West starting to take serious action to combat smog and acid rain. Sulphur dioxide doesn't stay in the atmosphere, so the effec
  6. Wow, Ghosty, didn't know you'd gone full on irrational denier troll. But then you're a troll anyway, so I guess it's your natural habitat. Why don't you actually educate yourself on the science, then you might be able to make a relevant contribution to this debate. Tell you what, why don't you post some specific examples of "flawed science "climate change" propoganda" and I'll tell you why you are wrong.
  7. Waaaah! Waaah! Fixing Climate Change is haaaard. So we should do nothing. Just another piece of fossil fuel funded propoganda. It will be ignored, as it should.
  8. Let me help you out with that then. Here's just a few.... 1) Interconnector - Every aspect of it, 2) Considerably more challenging site and terrain. 3) Considerably larger and complex engineering challenge. 4) 45% of the developer's shareholding is in the hands of muppets. 1. The Interconnector will be paid for as a part of the grid through the service charge everyone in the UK pays. It might add 20p or so to your annual bill. 2. How? The Burradale site is on top of a hill. The Viking turbines will be on top of hills. How is it any different? 3. Rubbish, a wind turbine is a wind
  9. Apart from maintenance costs, every turn of the Burradale blades has been profit for several years now. IIRC Burradale paid off the loan that built it 5 years early. I see no reason why VE won't be the same.
  10. Urabug, you're missing a crucial point here. Our electricity is subsidised. It always has been. Very heavily subsidised. We'd all be paying a lot more for our power if we were buying direct from Gremista because generating electricity by burning diesel is insanely expensive compared to pretty much any other type of generation you care to mention. As long as there is no price on carbon emissions burning coal in huge stations like Drax will always be the cheapest way to generate power. And that's the invisible subsidy that the fossil fuel generators get. They can dump their waste into the atmosp
  11. "A months worth of rain in a day". The headline speaks for itself. And how does the road affect things up-hill of the road? Easy - if it is uphill of the road, the road has cut through/across the layer of peat on the hill destabilising it and contributes to it breaking away above the road and flowing down over it. Seems like common sense to me, of course the 'headline' has also been a contributing factor, I didn't say the building of the roads was the main cause. And the point I've been trying to make, and obviously failing, is that Shetland is already covered with roads that cut up, do
  12. Redburn, Bigton. Autumn 1978 - The saturated hillside gave way under the weight of the road, taking the road with it for approx 25 yards. (my emphasis) And when was that road built? How long had that road been there before the landslide? My point is that the weather has changed. We are now seeing far more intense cloudbursts which are causing the landslides. These will continue to happen as long as we are in this new climate until there is no peat left on the hills anywhere in Shetland. There is nothing we can do about this. Welcome to the Anthropocene. Given that recent previous a
  13. "A months worth of rain in a day". The headline speaks for itself. And how does the road affect things up-hill of the road?
  14. It never ceases to astonish me how people have bought into this EXPERIMENTAL restoration programme. How many acres are there of damaged peat? How many acres are going to be destroyed with the proposed wind turbines and all the other peripherals being built, not just the access roads? Since when have negatives been more favourable than positives? I'll take an EXPERIMENTAL Peat Restoration Project over no restoration project at all. You never know, it might actually work.
  15. No more than the hundreds of miles of roads already cutting through the peat hill have already increased the likelihood of landslides. If you can demonstrate a link between the recent landslides and the existing roads, then you can present a case for increased risk from the access roads. As there seems to be no correlation between the recent landslides and the existing roads, then good luck with that. Hardly a like-for-like comparison though, given what the proposed access roads would lead to, together with the number of access roads being proposed. True, the 100+ miles of access roads
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