Jump to content

  • Log in with Twitter Log In with LinkedIn Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

With your Shetlink login details, all classifieds, private messages, and invoices are now accessed through the new Njord | Market system. Please see Njord | Market FAQ for more details.

Photo

Co2 emissions


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Twerto

Twerto

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2601 posts

Posted 23 January 2007 - 04:12 PM

Just being goign through some figures based upon the Co2 emissions on an average car..

and come up with this...

The average car produces about 275 grams of Carbon Dioxide per mile
A cyclist produces about 120 grams of Carbon Dioxide per mile
A serious jogger produces about 300 grams of Carbon Dioxide per mile

based upon a human beign emiting 6litre of air a minute and this can increase to more than 600litre when we are cycling or jogging.

#2 Fjool

Fjool

    Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPip
  • 4206 posts

Posted 23 January 2007 - 04:16 PM

Interesting observation but I suspect that your figures are broken. Can you provide a source because my hat is looking tasty? ;)

(Also bear in mind that a person inside a car is still emitting carbon dioxide)

#3 Guest_Anonymous_*

Guest_Anonymous_*
  • Guests

Posted 23 January 2007 - 06:15 PM

these figures would change greatly if you worked out what they produced per hour travelling at there average speed??

#4 Carlos

Carlos

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 847 posts

Posted 23 January 2007 - 07:38 PM

based upon a human beign emiting 6litre of air a minute and this can increase to more than 600litre when we are cycling or jogging.


An average emission of near 10 l/sec would seem unlikely....

Also human emission of CO2 is part of a closed cycle.... it's balanced by the plants we eat having taken in O2 and carbon.

Burning fossil fules could be seen as part of a closed cycle too.... but if it is normally a very long term cycle and if we are emiting a lot in one go.... things change a little.

#5 trout

trout

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 6453 posts

Posted 23 January 2007 - 07:48 PM

Humans don't exhale pure CO2 anyhow. Composite "air" is only partially converted in our lungs. Is it not about 500 Litres a day that we hoch up in "normal" circumstances?

#6 moorit

moorit

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 633 posts

Posted 23 January 2007 - 08:31 PM

You are definitely producing less CO2 if you get the bus instead of walking to work.

#7 Carlos

Carlos

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 847 posts

Posted 23 January 2007 - 11:41 PM

You are definitely producing less CO2 if you get the bus instead of walking to work.


Well..... overall, but like I was saying it is comparing two different things.
The CO2 you output brething is balanced by your eatign of plants. You cannot output any more carbon or oxygen than you already took in from the same system.

The bus on the other hand is outputing CO2 that was slowly removed from the ecosystem over millions of years and previously contained and is now being put back much quicker.....

Scooping water up out the sink and tipping it back in will never make it overflow, but turning the tap on will.

#8 moorit

moorit

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 633 posts

Posted 24 January 2007 - 01:43 PM

A bit too complex for me Carlos.

It's a lot simpler.

The bus is going anyway, whether I am on it or not. :wink:

#9 Carlos

Carlos

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 847 posts

Posted 24 January 2007 - 01:52 PM

If you're not on the bus then you're not responsable for any of it's CO2 ;-)

But yes..... depending where you take the limits of the system you're look at you can get different answers....... always read the fine print ;-)

#10 Twerto

Twerto

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2601 posts

Posted 24 January 2007 - 02:00 PM

These figure are undoubtadlty based on broad assumptions.. as there at 101 or more variables to take into consideration. but by using the mean avargae..

ie Co2 emissions for an averge car and the average person.. that the sort of ball park figures you come up with..

you could go totally indepth.. but again i dont ahve 6 months to spend doing a thesis on the subject :P

and to answer trout.. the % of Co2 in the air was taken in to account when doing the figures..

Again i know the figures are more than like not right/precise.. but i thought it projected an interesting look on te subject.

#11 McFly

McFly

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1411 posts

Posted 24 January 2007 - 02:07 PM

Just to confuse the issue even more :wink: http://bicycleuniver...anspo/beef.html

#12 Njugle

Njugle

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 6910 posts

Posted 24 January 2007 - 09:32 PM

I had no intention of joining this thread, as my car is not exactly a Prius, but internet wanderings produced this interesting set of stats.

Here is a snapshot in figures of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), the principal greenhouse gas, according to lifestyle, product and sector:

PER CAPITA CO2 (Source: International Energy Agency, IEA. Figures are in tonnes of CO2 per person per year)

- North America: United States 19.5 tonnes; Canada 17; Mexico 3.7

- Europe: Germany 10.2 tonnes; Britain 9.1; France 6.4

- Asia-Pacific: Australia 17.1 tonnes; New Zealand 8.3; China 3.2; India 1; Bangladesh 0.2

- Middle East-North Africa: Saudi Arabia 13.3 tonnes; Algeria 2.5

- Africa: South Africa 8.2 tonnes; Kenya 0.2

POLLUTION PER ACTIVITY (On the basis of a western Europe lifestyle, where one litre of petrol, or gasoline, causes 2.7 kilos (5.9 pounds) of CO2. Source: Jean-Marc Jancovici, French climate and energy consultant)

- One year of car driving (14,000 kilometers, 8,750 miles): 3.78 tonnes of CO2

- Return flight Paris-New York, second class: 1.6 tonnes of CO2

- One year's lighting for average-sized home: Depends on energy source, varying from four kilos (8.8 pounds) of CO2 for hydro to 400 kilos (880 pounds) for coal-fired plant.

- One year's heating oil for 100m2 (1,076-square-feet) dwelling: 4.86 tonnes of CO2.

- One kilo (2.2 pounds) of beef, cooked and ready to eat: 3.7 kilos (8.14 pounds) of CO2. Figure includes proportionate cost of making tractor and agriculture chemicals, does not include greenhouse-gas emissions from cows and fertilisers.

- One kilo (2.2 pounds) of locally-caught fish: 1.6 kilos (3.5 pounds) of CO2

- One kilo (2.2 pounds) of ocean-caught tuna: 3.2 kilos (7.04 pounds) of CO2

- One kilo (2.2 pounds) of prawns (shrimp): 8 kilos (17.6 pounds) of CO2

- One bottle of champagne: 1.7 kilos (3.75 pounds) of CO2

- US- or Asian-made flat screen for computer: 1.3 tonnes (2.9 pounds) of CO2

FOSSIL FUEL USE: EMISSIONS PER SECTOR (Source: IEA)

- Power production: 40 percent

- Transport: 21 percent

- Industry: 17 percent

- Buildings: 14 percent

- Other sectors: 8 percent.


Apart from anything else that's totally changed my perspective of Asian CO2 emissions! And us brits are pretty shoddy really ain't we? :? But the biggest surprise for me is the Ozzys. Shocking! 8O

#13 moorit

moorit

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 633 posts

Posted 24 January 2007 - 09:38 PM

Do they have CO2 in India ?

#14 Pooks

Pooks

    Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPip
  • 2603 posts

Posted 24 January 2007 - 10:41 PM

Sodastream sales have maybe taken off in Aussieland. :)

#15 Fjool

Fjool

    Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPip
  • 4206 posts

Posted 24 January 2007 - 10:54 PM

Sodastream sales have maybe taken off in Aussieland. :)


That's an interesting point... I wonder how they produce the CO2 for fizzy drinks? I know beer is fermented, but what about colas and such?

Is it possible to cheaply remove CO2 from the air, thus making them carbon-neutral, or are they dissolving limestone in vinegar, say?

Wondered a bit about this site though:
http://dwb.unl.edu/T...l/feature2.html

Carbonation gives life to any beverage

I shouldn't wonder! Fizzy tea anyone?