Jump to content

  • Log in with Twitter Log In with LinkedIn Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

With your Shetlink login details, all classifieds, private messages, and invoices are now accessed through the new Njord | Market system. Please see Njord | Market FAQ for more details.

Photo

Tsunami in Shetland(s)


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 nebheperure

nebheperure

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:42 AM

It would be interesting to know how many people would have died if tsunami would hit Shetland(s). Any ideas?>

#2 ISOT

ISOT

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 365 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:47 AM

:D

What size of Tsunami were you thinkin of?

Cheers

#3 Njugle

Njugle

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 6910 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:49 AM

I'm afraid you'll have to be more specific neb. From what direction and of what level? Compared to the tsunami's that have hit in the past?


Or if you mean a really big tsunami, like from a large meteor strike: ±23,000.

#4 EM

EM

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1752 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:51 AM

It would be interesting to know...

Why?

#5 Njugle

Njugle

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 6910 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 12:00 PM

Now that I come to think of it, the answer is a proven zero. Two seismic events in the past five years would have spawned tsunamis, as such, and neither tsunami was even noticed, let alone fatal.

#6 nebheperure

nebheperure

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 12:07 PM

:D

What size of Tsunami were you thinkin of?

Cheers


be specific otherwise no reply (H=50m) ;) haaa aaaaaa.....

read it:As with earthquakes, several attempts have been made to set up scales of tsunami intensity or magnitude to allow comparison between different events.[26]

Intensity scales

The first scales used routinely to measure the intensity of tsunami were the Sieberg-Ambraseys scale, used in the Mediterranean Sea and the Imamura-Iida intensity scale, used in the Pacific Ocean. The latter scale was modified by Soloviev, who calculated the Tsunami intensity I according to the formula:

I=1/2+log2 Hav

where Hav is the average wave height along the nearest coast. This scale, known as the Soloviev-Imamura tsunami intensity scale, is used in the global tsunami catalogues compiled by the NGDC/NOAA and the Novosibirsk Tsunami Laboratory as the main parameter for the size of the tsunami.

Magnitude scales

The first scale that genuinely calculated a magnitude for a tsunami, rather than an intensity at a particular location was the ML scale proposed by Murty & Loomis based on the potential energy.[26] Difficulties in calculating the potential energy of the tsunami mean that this scale is rarely used. Abe introduced the tsunami magnitude scale Mt, calculated from,

Mt=alogh+blog R=D
where h is the maximum tsunami-wave amplitude (in m) measured by a tide gauge at a distance R from the epicenter, a, b & D are constants used to make the Mt scale match as closely as possible with the moment magnitude scale.[27]

#7 EM

EM

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1752 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 12:23 PM

be specific otherwise no reply


I'll try again.

It would be interesting to know...

Why would it be interesting to know how many people would die in Shetland due to a Tsunami?

#8 as

as

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 188 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 12:32 PM

The OP seems to be obsessed with reducing Shetland's population. First gunmen, now tsunamis. what's next?

#9 paulb

paulb

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4871 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 12:36 PM

he must feel the need for space.

#10 icepick239

icepick239

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 748 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 02:35 PM

The OP seems to be obsessed with reducing Shetland's population. First gunmen, now tsunamis. what's next?

neb... don't forget the Lava Flows coming down Ronas Hill...
  • George. likes this

#11 ISOT

ISOT

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 365 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 02:59 PM

:D

What size of Tsunami were you thinkin of?

Cheers


be specific otherwise no reply (H=50m) ;) haaa aaaaaa.....read it:As with earthquakes, several attempts have been made to set up scales of tsunami intensity or magnitude to allow comparison between different events.[26]

Intensity scales

The first scales used routinely to measure the intensity of tsunami were the Sieberg-Ambraseys scale, used in the Mediterranean Sea and the Imamura-Iida intensity scale, used in the Pacific Ocean. The latter scale was modified by Soloviev, who calculated the Tsunami intensity I according to the formula:

I=1/2+log2 Hav

where Hav is the average wave height along the nearest coast. This scale, known as the Soloviev-Imamura tsunami intensity scale, is used in the global tsunami catalogues compiled by the NGDC/NOAA and the Novosibirsk Tsunami Laboratory as the main parameter for the size of the tsunami.

Magnitude scales

The first scale that genuinely calculated a magnitude for a tsunami, rather than an intensity at a particular location was the ML scale proposed by Murty & Loomis based on the potential energy.[26] Difficulties in calculating the potential energy of the tsunami mean that this scale is rarely used. Abe introduced the tsunami magnitude scale Mt, calculated from,

Mt=alogh+blog R=D
where h is the maximum tsunami-wave amplitude (in m) measured by a tide gauge at a distance R from the epicenter, a, b & D are constants used to make the Mt scale match as closely as possible with the moment magnitude scale.[27]


Is this not a reply! :wink:

#12 GT

GT

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 202 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 05:35 PM

Past tsunami striking Shetland were not caused by earthquake but by underwater avalanche
see
http://www.landforms...mi deposits.htm

#13 Ghostrider

Ghostrider

    1crankymofo

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9361 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:27 PM

It would be interesting to know how many people would have died if tsunami would hit Shetland(s). Any ideas?>


If the result was to move Shetlnd someplace warmer, I really don't care.

#14 icepick239

icepick239

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 748 posts

Posted 10 August 2011 - 01:01 PM

It would be interesting to know how many people would have died if tsunami would hit Shetland(s). Any ideas?>

Plenty..try Smoking a Kipper instead.. :roll:

#15 DizzyKipper

DizzyKipper

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 837 posts

Posted 10 August 2011 - 10:07 PM

Plenty..try Smoking a Kipper instead.. :roll:


:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: