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Fibre to cabinet broadband


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49 replies to this topic

#1 grinner

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 06:59 PM

Is anyone having slow speeds at night  with their broadband mine is down to 4.75meg after 6 pm ?



#2 rgibson

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 03:17 AM

Yes mine is terrible. Was pulling 2 Mb and upload @ 8Mb. Can barely stream anything. Before I was getting at least 20Mb download. Have phoned BT but they are useless. 



#3 Equality Street

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 09:42 AM

Move to Fair Isle. Soon enough they'll have super fast broadband! Only costing £250,000! That's an expenditure of £4500+ plus per man, woman and child on the island. Probably cheaper to give each person a subscription to a personal satellite service for decades, and provide the kit, but that's by the by...


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#4 Frances144

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 10:49 AM

I may give up soon and go back to pigeons.



#5 RileyBKing

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 05:52 PM

If we could get 4.75 mb/s at ANY time we would be over the moon.

BT Superfast Broadband? hahaha......

Apparently the exchange is enabled but actually providing the service to our location is officially "challenging" which I take to be code for "it ain't happening mate"

#6 brian.smith

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 09:19 PM

Move to Fair Isle. Soon enough they'll have super fast broadband! Only costing £250,000! That's an expenditure of £4500+ plus per man, woman and child on the island. Probably cheaper to give each person a subscription to a personal satellite service for decades, and provide the kit, but that's by the by...

Well we pay the same in Fair Isle as everyone else for the service yet receive a fraction of the speed we have chosen our scheme so it lasts with little ongoing maintenance  costs yes it was expensive but those per person costs mean a lot more than broadband speed we already have a new applicant family which also helps to preserve our school nurse ferry etc etc


Edited by brian.smith, 02 March 2016 - 09:20 PM.


#7 Equality Street

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 12:48 PM

 

Move to Fair Isle. Soon enough they'll have super fast broadband! Only costing £250,000! That's an expenditure of £4500+ plus per man, woman and child on the island. Probably cheaper to give each person a subscription to a personal satellite service for decades, and provide the kit, but that's by the by...

Well we pay the same in Fair Isle as everyone else for the service yet receive a fraction of the speed we have chosen our scheme so it lasts with little ongoing maintenance  costs yes it was expensive but those per person costs mean a lot more than broadband speed we already have a new applicant family which also helps to preserve our school nurse ferry etc etc

 

Fair enough - but £250,000 seems a bit extravagant, especially in these austere times. If folk are put off moving to Fair Isle because of YouTube buffering then you have to wonder what they expect from remote island life in general... 



#8 Colin

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 01:07 PM

"Fair enough - but £250,000 seems a bit extravagant, especially in these austere times. If folk are put off moving to Fair Isle because of YouTube buffering then you have to wonder what they expect from remote island life in general..."

 

All the comforts of inner city life perhaps?

 

Overly cynical about this but, maybe they just expect to form an orderly queue for as many "hand-outs" as they can get...



#9 brian.smith

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 07:44 PM

well you either no or you dont we are mainly a crofting community we run our own services and most will know you cant support a family on a croft alone. Most secondary incomes now realy on some form of remote working so connections such as these are essential. Maybe Colin you think we should just abandon the Isle. This is nothing to do with forming orderly queue's for grants it is trying to get a diminishing population back on its feet. We did our homework and carried out much research and three main points were Identified. Broadband better and faster, Transport more reliable, and housing better and more widely available we have achieved the first and last with grant funding for only one.

 

Horns shows your knowledge of how the internet serves commerce when the best you can come up with is you tube!!!


Edited by brian.smith, 03 March 2016 - 07:45 PM.


#10 Colin

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 09:43 PM

I just find it strange that so many think that "faster" and "better" broadband is the cure to so many problems.

 

If you run any kind of business then, by all means, set up a web site..  This, incidentally, does NOT require "faster" or "better" broadband and, any visitors to your site will be subject to their own particular internet connections idiosyncrasies, not yours...

 

If the site is successful then it will begin to generate revenue BUT, this information will almost certainly be transmitted to you via email and, that also does NOT require faster broadband.

 

There are scenarios where a reliable, high speed connection would be advantageous but, as Horns suggested, the main beneficiaries would appear to be "browsing addicts".

 

Anyway, good luck with it.  I will watch with interest and, I would be surprised indeed if it made any real difference to "life on Fair Isle"



#11 Roachmill

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 09:39 AM

^Not every job or business that relies on the internet is a web site and, even those that are, still require a good amount of bandwidth to maintain and update in this day and age. Besides, a relatively high speed connection will have other uses than purely business (and YouTube  :roll:) that simply haven't been possible over the current connections.

 

Or perhaps everyone on Fair Isle should just carry on knitting sat by the fire like the good old days... and they could use their dial-up modems for goalposts when the weather comes fine  :razz: Plus, the money is coming from an allotted grant scheme specifically for just this kind of thing isn't it? From the sounds of things, Brian and the rest involved have gotten of their arses and gone out and secured all this which should be applauded. I can all too easily imagine the grumbling were the money to go somewhere further south!


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#12 hjasga

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 10:14 AM

I just find it strange that so many think that "faster" and "better" broadband is the cure to so many problems.

 

If you run any kind of business then, by all means, set up a web site..  This, incidentally, does NOT require "faster" or "better" broadband and, any visitors to your site will be subject to their own particular internet connections idiosyncrasies, not yours...

 

If the site is successful then it will begin to generate revenue BUT, this information will almost certainly be transmitted to you via email and, that also does NOT require faster broadband.

 

There are scenarios where a reliable, high speed connection would be advantageous but, as Horns suggested, the main beneficiaries would appear to be "browsing addicts".

 

Anyway, good luck with it.  I will watch with interest and, I would be surprised indeed if it made any real difference to "life on Fair Isle"

 

Sorry but this is a very ignorant post. The difference between average and 'superfast' broadband has little bearing on general web browsing - chances are you wouldn't notice the fractions of a second faster that a Shetlink page would load after upgrading. Where it does have a big effect is on wider internet services: file transfers, video conferencing, collegiate working on shared documents in real time. These can also massively improve productivity in the modern workplace and would allow enterprise that simply isn't possible in Shetland at the moment. 


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#13 Colin

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 12:54 PM

Sorry but this is a very ignorant post. The difference between average and 'superfast' broadband has little bearing on general web browsing - chances are you wouldn't notice the fractions of a second faster that a Shetlink page would load after upgrading. Where it does have a big effect is on wider internet services: file transfers, video conferencing, collegiate working on shared documents in real time. These can also massively improve productivity in the modern workplace and would allow enterprise that simply isn't possible in Shetland at the moment. 

 

 

Ignorant? Moi?  :thmbsup

 

Seeing as I work in IT I would think that, perhaps, I know(?) a little bit more than most and, you don't need to waste the "sales pitch" on me...

 

Anyone who uses the internet should realise that there are several "bottlenecks" ranging from contention issues that cause huge performance drops to the undeniable fact that your "target" is only ever going to be as fast as the slowest link in the chain..

 

OK, a £250K investment should help relieve part of that but, I still wonder just who the main beneficiaries will be..

 

Also, your statement that "and would allow enterprise that simply isn't possible in Shetland at the moment." is wrong..

Businesses in and around the great metropolis of Lerwick can already access 80Mb Fibre which is more than adequete for "wider internet services".



#14 hjasga

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 02:25 PM

I said it was an ignorant post, not that you yourself are necessarily ignorant. Knowledge of IT certainly didn't shine through in denouncing faster broadband based on the idea companies would only benefit through customers accessing their websites. I'm not sure the point of your paragraph about bottlenecks - you'll always be as slow as the slowest part of the chain, so... what? Don't upgrade services in Shetland, often the slowest part of the chain? 

 

It's great that Lerwick, Scalloway and much of the south Mainland now have access to FTC broadband, in some cases even FTTP broadband. Much of rural Shetland struggles to get even reliable ADSL though and that is a cause of significant economic and social disadvantage. Affording better connectivity would afford business opportunities that are not currently available - whether somebody working remotely from Unst or even a digital storage centre as was proposed for Lerwick recently (let's face it, the land required for that would be far more readily available elsewhere if the connections could match). 


Edited by hjasga, 04 March 2016 - 02:26 PM.

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#15 brian.smith

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 04:57 PM

^Not every job or business that relies on the internet is a web site and, even those that are, still require a good amount of bandwidth to maintain and update in this day and age. Besides, a relatively high speed connection will have other uses than purely business (and YouTube  :roll:) that simply haven't been possible over the current connections.

 

Or perhaps everyone on Fair Isle should just carry on knitting sat by the fire like the good old days... and they could use their dial-up modems for goalposts when the weather comes fine  :razz: Plus, the money is coming from an allotted grant scheme specifically for just this kind of thing isn't it? From the sounds of things, Brian and the rest involved have gotten of their arses and gone out and secured all this which should be applauded. I can all too easily imagine the grumbling were the money to go somewhere further south!

This sums it up. We dint come on here and moaned about our broadband we did something about it. Two and a half years of meeting after meeting traveling at my own expense juggling figures speaking to customers assessing need costing re costing business plans company formations and Colin for your information this was all done without receiving one penny of public funding. Even opening the bank account cost two of our residents £50 each.

I have an IT background and still support old customers down south this will open up remote working to Fair Isle improving employment we have potentially attracted a family who are self supported through remote network management so life goes beyond a website and you tube when you talk of broadband speeds.


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#16 Urabug

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 05:09 PM

I just wonder in a few years from now when the roll out of broadband has been completed and the evaluation of the benifits from it are completed,if the findings will be as complimentary as many would like to imply.

 

The cost of useing computers is definately getting more and more expensive,service providers,printer ink,decent virus protection,not to mention the many "sites" that require costly suscriptions.ect,ect.

 

Of course those who provide those web sites have to make money from it,but advertiseing in my opinion is now getting out of hand and subscriptions to favorite web sites more expensive. 

 

So who will be the winners the service providers or the users .Hopefully both but i wonder.

 

So I tend to agree a little with Colin. 



#17 brian.smith

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 05:52 PM

You are right Urabug however this is how communications are moving and if we don't move with them we will be left behind. Big companies very rarely now have meetings or presentations or training in person now due to high costs getting everyone to the same place. The need to see who you are talking to seems for business to be the over riding factor. I am employed by a national company and we have a group meeting once a week I take part by phone everyone else is on video I am not saying that is the best way to go but it is the way its going. Even down south now solicitor client visits in prison are done by video link, court appearances are done at procedural diets by video link.

 

Newspapers are online the list goes on and on. The biggest thing of late is plugging yourself into a machine and connecting to a doctor when you are unwell its all a bit mad


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#18 hjasga

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 08:04 PM

The cost of useing computers is definately getting more and more expensive,service providers,printer ink,decent virus protection,not to mention the many "sites" that require costly suscriptions.ect,ect.

What?! 

 

Computers are cheaper than they've ever been. If all you're doing is browsing the internet and doing basic word processing, you can get a Chromebook laptop for comfortably under £200. If you need a high end performance machine it'll cost a fraction of what it would have even ten years ago.

 

Broadband is getting cheaper all the time, albeit with faster speeds meaning more expensive options are available for those who want them.

 

You can get very powerful virus protection completely free (and I mean legal options, rather than easily accessed pirated copies if you are so inclined).

 

Subscription sites are not a necessity - if you want them though the choice is there, and often they are cheaper than traditional means (e.g. Netflix is far, far cheaper than a subscription to Sky). 

 

Yes, printer ink is still a rip off, but with tablets and laptops getting cheaper every day the need for reams and reams of paper is constantly reducing. Hand anybody under 30 a print out and they'll probably wonder why you've wasted paper on it. 


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#19 hjasga

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 08:26 PM

Congratulations by the way Brian, it's good to see hard work pay off and receiving this funding is definitely a big achievement for a community like Fair Isle. 


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#20 Urabug

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 08:40 PM

Yes hjasga hardware is cheap enough, and so is some very good software,but in my experience more and more adverts are swamping the internet and the only way to get rid of them is to pay.

 

I have Vista on one of my computers and I am being promped to upgrade to windows 10, but when I try to, get told that this is not possible from xp or vista .Only option is to buy windows 10 --£80.

 

I also have excel,word and one note updateing to 10 will probably mean I will lose this.

 

Also like a game of cards,in windows 10 they are still available but you have to pay or put up with adverts popping up.

 

I know openoffice is free and have to admit it is very good.

 

All in all,not sure I could totally agree with you.