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Fibre to cabinet broadband


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#21 hjasga

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 09:29 PM

Yes hjasga hardware is cheap enough, and so is some very good software,but in my experience more and more adverts are swamping the internet and the only way to get rid of them is to pay.

 

I have Vista on one of my computers and I am being promped to upgrade to windows 10, but when I try to, get told that this is not possible from xp or vista .Only option is to buy windows 10 --£80.

 

I also have excel,word and one note updateing to 10 will probably mean I will lose this.

 

Also like a game of cards,in windows 10 they are still available but you have to pay or put up with adverts popping up.

 

I know openoffice is free and have to admit it is very good.

 

All in all,not sure I could totally agree with you.

 

Adverts are a means of paying for the hard work that goes in to providing web content. If you want content produced for free there's plenty out there. Do you complain about adverts in print newspapers or on television? How do you suggest media companies fund their work otherwise? Given you're also seemingly opposed to subscriptions I'm not sure what you're suggesting, other than that people should work for nothing for your benefit. 

 

If you haven't upgraded since Vista then it's hardly a surprise you should have to pay. Again, this is a simple result of a lot of work going into these things. If you don't want to do that, there are open source alternatives. You could install Ubuntu, a free open source operating system, if paying is really a big burden. I expect the convenience of Windows makes it worth the outlay though. 

 

Upgrading to Windows 10 shouldn't necessarily mean you lose your Office programs. If you've lost record of your product key you may, but the same would stand if you'd lost an old book or video or vinyl. There are plenty of free alternatives - not just Open Office - and they are increasingly cross compatible. Personally I use Google Drive, which I find far superior to Microsoft Office for what I need. 

 

What sort of card games do you mean there? Solitaire, Hearts, poker? I'm almost certain there will be free alternatives out there somewhere but hard to suggest anything without knowing exactly. 


Edited by hjasga, 04 March 2016 - 09:31 PM.


#22 hjasga

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 09:40 PM

Also, whilst it may be on dubious grounds ethically, it is entirely illegal to block internet ads. There are various means to do that and a few options that do not require advanced IT knowledge to put in place. Some providers are beginning to get wise to it and block users who block ads, but those are still few and far between. 



#23 Colin

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 09:51 PM

Yes hjasga hardware is cheap enough, and so is some very good software,but in my experience more and more adverts are swamping the internet and the only way to get rid of them is to pay.

 

 

Use an Ad Blocker.  Quite a few free ones available


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#24 Suffererof1crankymofo

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 11:07 PM

A £200 chromebook wouldn't cope with my work.  A high spec laptop back in 2002 bought with full version of Office Professional was around £1,500.  Now, the same laptop struggles.  Five years ago, bought an all-in-one, no need to buy Office as just loaded the version bought in 2002 because back then, the licence of it covered you for more than one machine.  This year, replaced the all-in-one with similar model so got obviously a recent version of Windows and got a newer version of Office.  The cost of both PCs very close as were the specs, only about £50 in it, plus going back even further, the PC bought in the late 1990s was around the same price range - £500 to £700.  Laptops have come down in price significantly but I wouldn't say like-for-like PCs have in the mid range.

 

Price of Office Professional was around £480 mark, and even now if you don't buy Office at the same time you buy a new PC it costs more.  However, you have to hunt to get Office (and you just get a key now as opposed to getting a CD and key), the licence is only for one machine (as opposed to 3 or up to 5 like the old days) and they want you to take out a yearly subscription to Office365 instead.  The last time I used it, OpenOffice just couldn't cope with tables and columns.

 

There's also tablets and iPads now, and hybrid laptops whereas before there wasn't.

 

Speed isn't a huge factor but reliability of connection is.  When using TeamViewer or Dropbox or the like, it's no fun when something takes 3 hours to transfer simply because there's a broadband fault outside Inverness.  Uploading and/or editing a document on the Microsoft Drive isn't fun unless you have from Windows 7 upwards. Being logged onto the file server in London isn't fun when the entire internet connection goes down either, and again if there's a bottleneck waiting for your cursor to move on the Word document on the London server isn't fun.

 

Printer:  The old workhorse HP Laser bought back in 2002.  Was a pain when Win 7 came out and the only driver which worked was the one it said wouldn't, wasn't such a pain on Win 8.1 and for TeamViewer network printing, it just thinks it is a different machine but it works.  Cost back then?  £99 from Staples.  Cost for a similar model now?  £89.  Laser toner is cheaper than ink cartridges.  Will upgrade later this year to Win 10 so will be interesting to see if I get the old beast to work but no doubt will be mimicking another laser printer.  If I felt so inclined, colour laser printers have dropped significantly in price.

 

I haven't subscribed to the superduper all allegedly singing and dancing Infinity because why should I pay to get a speed others elsewhere in the UK are paying for the same as what I'm paying now?  Besides, there's been several complaints about the reliability of it too.  It's bad enough when the kids get in from school and the speed most definitely drops.  I average a speed of around 4.5 to 6.5, right now it's 5.87.  If it drops below 3, I can't work.

 

Fax line:  who needs one now?  Not really the call any more for a fax line given you can scan and PDF a document.  That's another thing, PDF packages now cheaper than they were years ago.

 

So reliability and consistency at the moment is more important to me.  The extra money to BT just simply isn't worth it.  It's a balancing act and given BT get around £70 a month before I've even picked up the phone, as a business user I'm not inclined to give them any more for what some have reported as an unreliable service.  If anything has gone up in cost, it's the BT bill.



#25 hjasga

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Posted 05 March 2016 - 10:23 AM

A £200 chromebook wouldn't cope with my work.


Well lah dee dah.  ;-)



#26 Urabug

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Posted 05 March 2016 - 11:19 AM

The main thing is that all this technology becomes available to all and remains at an affordable price for all whether it be for buisness,pleasure or both.

 

No use having a Rolls Royce if you cannot afford the fuel.

 

With the economic state at the moment this could become a major problem.


Edited by Urabug, 05 March 2016 - 11:26 AM.


#27 hjasga

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Posted 05 March 2016 - 11:27 AM

I really don't know what you're talking about any more. 



#28 George.

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Posted 05 March 2016 - 01:25 PM

I really don't know what you're talking about any more. 

 

Don't worry, you're not the only one.



#29 Equality Street

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 09:26 AM

Well, to be honest if it's a grant scheme and the community has put a lot of work into it then fair play to them. I am, I admit, back tracking a little. It's just that, with so many folk being made redundant on mainline Shetland, the specter of more local government cuts looming over us for the next 3 years and the apparent increase in folks having to use food banks, £250000 on super-fast broadband provision for a remote island of 55 folk seemed a bit odd on the face of it.  


Edited by Horns 'O' Da Geo, 07 March 2016 - 09:27 AM.

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#30 Urabug

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 12:54 PM

Not all that many years ago I like many others had to join lengthy queues to use payphones in the airports,at the railway stations wherever. Such was the demand for these payphones that great pressure was put on the Post Office/BT to provide more,then along came privatization and competition, Mercury had payphones all over the place.

 

And then came the mobile phone, the result of that one hardly ever sees a payphone being used nowadays and of course Mercury as far as I know no longer exists.

 

Now that technology has progressed even further to 4G AND 5G mobiles giving folk good access to the internet, and mobile coverage getting better all the time this raises a few issues.

 

 

1-      Will clients still want to use the conventional land lines or will many decide to use mobile technology only

 

2-      Will clients continue to afford to contribute to both land lines and mobile.  I know some contracts do this.

 

3-      Is this a valid reason conventional telephone providers might be a little hesitant in upgrading their landlines in case they end up like the payphones no longer required. 



#31 MuckleJoannie

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 10:08 PM

Once there is 99.9% coverage of phone masts and 5g rolls out having landline broadband is going to seem anachronistic. 



#32 Ghostrider

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 11:35 PM

^ I'd add climate/weather proof phone coverage to that list too. Given the amounts of down time on some networks in some locations, it would be madness to rely on it for commercial purposes until there's a vast improvement in resilience.

 

Personally I'll stick with hardwired internets with cellphone as very a reluctant back up as long as hardwired remains viable, relying on just one type of connection is folly, and if/when hardwired goes off the scale of being practical, I'll be looking at satellite as either main or backup, depending on what cellphone has become by if/when that happens.

 

Personally I find the internet currently accessible via cellphone as horrendously useless compared to the usability and functionality of the internet accessible by hardwired, so that's going to have to improve vastly as well to get me won over to cellphone internet.


Edited by Ghostrider, 22 September 2017 - 11:39 PM.


#33 Urabug

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 10:15 AM

I think it unlikely that every home in the UK will be upgraded to fibre, far to costly, more likely to be done wirelessly using similar methods to WiFi and Bluetooth .

 

The way technology is progressing who knows,but I cannot see companys like BT willing to spend thousands of pounds to upgrade some remote properties if they know that their customers will or already receive a good G4/G5 mobile signal,from an existing or pending mobile mast.

 

I suppose the whole thing comes down to cost,if land lines are the most economic then most folk may stay with them,but the portability of the mobile phone even if more expensive makes it more desirable.

 

Difficult to stick the desktop in my pocket! 

 

I would imagine that which ever way things develop resilience will be carefully considered to keep down on maintenance costs.

 

Routers wireless in,wireless out could well be the way things go.transmitters strategically placed to give maximum coverage.

 

We are likely to be sharing our neighbours  and each others "WiFi"  more in the future than we do at present.

 

Yes I see the copper cable as far as telecommunications is concerned gradually disappearing, but it has a long way to go yet, it is anachronistic right enough.



#34 Ghostrider

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 12:59 PM

^ Crystal ball gazing on this one is bedevilled by the whim of humans, which is very fickle.

 

It would be a no brainer that mobile technology would be the way of the future *IF* it was an overall viable replacement/alternative for everything a hardwired desktop can do, but its not. Yeah, carrying a desktop around with you doesn't work so good, but doing any volume of work on a mobile device doesn't work so good either, especially the more involved detailed stuff.

 

Mobile is fine for emails, browsing etc, if you can tolerate the altered functionality of websites that comes with it, but for working longer periods on websites or on documents its a fail, and its that side of things thats going to keep folk resisting a total shift to mobile technology only.



#35 Urabug

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 06:23 PM

Yeah,but do not forget Ghostrider that many of these modern devices are real smart and can mirror image each other.

 

So you can still do all your intricated work on the the desktop/laptop and have it on the mobile at the same time,in fact even my tv is smart.



#36 Suffererof1crankymofo

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 07:42 PM

Yeah,but do not forget Ghostrider that many of these modern devices are real smart and can mirror image each other.

 

So you can still do all your intricated work on the the desktop/laptop and have it on the mobile at the same time,in fact even my tv is smart.

Rubbish!  Whilst many residential users in the USA now only have a cell phone, all of my mates on the other side of the pond who have businesses still rely on a landline.

Occasionally, when BT has fallen over and on the rare occasion when mobile has remained in use, it was incredibly painful to connect to the London office and the internet phone connection didn't work.  Downloading a sound file - over 20 minutes compared to two minutes, working remotely on a Word document on the London file server - forget it.  Even my bosses hate remote working when they are out on-site with the iPads and wait until they are back in the office to download stuff.



#37 Urabug

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 08:12 PM

Rubbish indeed,still think that the advancements in mobile technology and increased coverage might have a considerable impact on the demand on landlines.

 

Time will tell!



#38 Spinner72

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 12:16 PM

There are already a number of places in the Isles with 4G but no decent (<1Mb) broadband. Its just a click of a button to make your mobile a wifi hotspot, so you can just use a laptop with no compromise on functionality. It is so much simpler to just use one thing, which you can take with you and access almost anywhere. I'm on a mobile internet connection just now.

 

There is no question whatsoever that I will ditch the landline if I can get a 4G signal at home.



#39 aaa22

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 03:27 PM

There are already a number of places in the Isles with 4G but no decent (<1Mb) broadband. Its just a click of a button to make your mobile a wifi hotspot, so you can just use a laptop with no compromise on functionality. It is so much simpler to just use one thing, which you can take with you and access almost anywhere. I'm on a mobile internet connection just now.

 

There is no question whatsoever that I will ditch the landline if I can get a 4G signal at h

But for a family I can say what with all the streaming of videos and games downloads that goes on, we use average 90gb. what 4g contract covers that amount of data at an affordable amount? I have heard that someone streamed sky movies here in Shetland on vodafone and got a £800 bill! there is not an easy way to stop your device from going over, and if you do it hurts the pocket really bad. all though I don’t use the landline i am stuck having to pay for line rental, a phone contract then the broadband. but its still cheaper than being several data sim cards for devices! Oh, and for those that shout tethering, look very closely at those terms and conditions, you may be allowed to but only at a monthly cap. Charges may still apply if you go over that amount. And they will know too, probably because your device will start downloading windows 10 updates.



#40 Ghostrider

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 05:35 PM

No doubt cellphone networks are, and will continue to make inroads as a sole alternative to hardwired landline internet where cellphone networks are capable, just as cellphones have made significant inroads as a sole viable alternative to landlne phones. The cellphone network has one hell of a long way to go though, especially in Shetland, before the connectivity and reliability of cellphone networks are that for a hell of a lot of us, especially those of us facing the coast hidden from signals by higher ground.

 

Round here the cell signal, like all TV, radio etc signals, is weak, drifting to unviable occasionally, and falls over with monontonous regularity for hours on end. Then, as aaa22 says, there's the cost factor. *If* you're somone on a cell connection already that your internet data traffic won't exceed the limit of your present deal, its a no brainer, but if you're either having to pay penalty charges for going over, or having to upgrade to a more expensive package to cope, having the landline soon makes financial sense. Then there's those of us who don't have a mobile phone, don't want a mobile phone, and don't want to have to deal with either phones nor internets when we're out and about - that's our 'sanity time' to escape for the cursed electronica that blights our everyday lives.


Edited by Ghostrider, 25 September 2017 - 05:37 PM.