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#41 Colin

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 06:38 PM

It is easy to forget that businesses require cheap, reliable telephone comms.  Ok "cheap" can be a bit misleading but, when it comes to reliability, landline wins every time.

There is also the little issue of Fax machines..  Want to carry one of those in your "mobile"?

 

I can't imagine any business that would hand out a dozen (or more) mobiles to staff members for normal, everyday business use..  The contract costs could be prohibitive and there would be little control over what the device is being used for. 

 

Also, the problem for customers/suppliers is which number do I call?  Will I get a switchboard that will route me to the correct handset?  Will I have to hold several minutes whilst it polls?  What if the requred handset is engaged, will I have to start all over?  Is it really worth the bother as I "know" that xyz & co still uses landline and can easily phone them and, if I use a landline, the call cost is much lower.

 

I know that the technology exists to overcome most (if not all) of the above but, as yet, it is still pretty expensive and can be complicated to set up.



#42 Urabug

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 07:33 PM

It is easy to forget that businesses require cheap, reliable telephone comms.  Ok "cheap" can be a bit misleading but, when it comes to reliability, landline wins every time.

There is also the little issue of Fax machines..  Want to carry one of those in your "mobile"?

 

I can't imagine any business that would hand out a dozen (or more) mobiles to staff members for normal, everyday business use..  The contract costs could be prohibitive and there would be little control over what the device is being used for. 

 

Also, the problem for customers/suppliers is which number do I call?  Will I get a switchboard that will route me to the correct handset?  Will I have to hold several minutes whilst it polls?  What if the requred handset is engaged, will I have to start all over?  Is it really worth the bother as I "know" that xyz & co still uses landline and can easily phone them and, if I use a landline, the call cost is much lower.

 

I know that the technology exists to overcome most (if not all) of the above but, as yet, it is still pretty expensive and can be complicated to set up.

The council,BT,SSE,Scottish Water,NHS just a few that I'm almost sure provide mobiles to there staff,but for business use only,personal calls are usually charged to the user .

 

Mobile phones can save companys lots of money especially for staff who travel about a lot.



#43 MuckleJoannie

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 09:45 PM

 

There is also the little issue of Fax machines..  Want to carry one of those in your "mobile"?

 

 

There are plenty of fax apps for mobile phones. Use the camera to photograph documents.

 

http://www.androidau...android-777290/



#44 George.

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 08:19 AM

There is also the little issue of Fax machines.. 

 

How many people use a fax machine now?



#45 Suffererof1crankymofo

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 12:42 PM

 

There is also the little issue of Fax machines.. 

 

How many people use a fax machine now?

 

Not as many as previously, and whilst there are apps available to send/receive faxes via e-mail, not everyone has e-mail.



#46 Suffererof1crankymofo

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 01:25 PM

 

It is easy to forget that businesses require cheap, reliable telephone comms.  Ok "cheap" can be a bit misleading but, when it comes to reliability, landline wins every time.

There is also the little issue of Fax machines..  Want to carry one of those in your "mobile"?

 

I can't imagine any business that would hand out a dozen (or more) mobiles to staff members for normal, everyday business use..  The contract costs could be prohibitive and there would be little control over what the device is being used for. 

 

Also, the problem for customers/suppliers is which number do I call?  Will I get a switchboard that will route me to the correct handset?  Will I have to hold several minutes whilst it polls?  What if the requred handset is engaged, will I have to start all over?  Is it really worth the bother as I "know" that xyz & co still uses landline and can easily phone them and, if I use a landline, the call cost is much lower.

 

I know that the technology exists to overcome most (if not all) of the above but, as yet, it is still pretty expensive and can be complicated to set up.

The council,BT,SSE,Scottish Water,NHS just a few that I'm almost sure provide mobiles to there staff,but for business use only,personal calls are usually charged to the user .

 

Mobile phones can save companys lots of money especially for staff who travel about a lot.

 

Nope.

I don't think you're getting it.  Do you have any experience of using a mobile phone instead of a desktop in a real business setting?  I do, not just in a self-employed capacity but also in my PAYE job.

The London surveyors I work for have.  Fax machine is still in use for some customers at their request.  A high percentage of the customers are overseas.  Do you have any idea of the call charges for overseas (outside of Europe) on mobiles?  I do.

VPN, dropbox, teamviewer and other programs utilised.  Switchboard software programmed so that calls can be diverted from extension numbers direct to surveyors' mobile phones.  For me, I have an internet telephone which means anyone calling my direct London number is answered by me here in Shetland.  I do get call drops frequently.  If I want to call my colleagues in London, I just dial the extension.  E-mails also diverted/copied/capable of being read on mobile phones and i-Pads.  i-Pads and mobile phones now tends to mean no need for separate digital cameras (unless say photographing and zooming in on flashings, chimney stacks, etc., then digital cameras used as resolution not good enough on i-Pads and mobile phones).

Now the guys and gals in London spend at least 70% of their working days out of the office due to the nature of the work.  They even prepare reports on the hoof, so time spent travelling on the underground/overhead train journey home is utilised by replying to e-mails/working on draft reports.  But sending digital photographs is a pain and uses up data allowances.

Using mobile phones/i-Pads to transfer data, no matter if hotspots are available, is not always cost-effective; time can really be of the essence.  In reality, if they are moving about, whilst it might be okay when they are grabbing a quick sandwich and a coffee (no, a full hour for lunch every day simply doesn't happen) to work on a document remotely sat on the file server, if they are on the train, they can't flick from one hot spot to another.

The firm has been utilising such technology as technology developed but hey, if you know more than a company who have real experience of doing so, hats off to you.  Believe me, my boss does know how much things cost.

Incidentally, not all of London W1 even has BT Infinity which reminds me ... the more people using mobile technology and standard landline broadband, the less capacity unless the suppliers increase it ... which they don't appear to be doing.  IMHO, mobile internet compliments landline broadband but right now, and even in the foreseeable future, for business users on the move, it simply is impracticable and most definitely is not cost-effective.



#47 Urabug

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 03:24 PM

I don't think you're getting it.  Do you have any experience of using a mobile phone instead of a desktop in a real business setting?  I do, not just in a self-employed capacity but also in my PAYE job.

 

I certainly am getting it ,only a very small percentage of mobile users will be in business .Not everyone has a vast amount of data to send or receive. 

 

Most of these mobiles are far to "pernickety"  for me,but appear plenty adequate for many others.

 

No matter where you go there is always folk on their mobiles

 

The point is these mobiles devices are getting better and better all the time and I do see them in direct competition with the upgrade of landlines especially in low populated very rural areas,where there are only. a few customers. Landline providers are in the business to make a profit !

 

If I was about to spend thousands of pounds upgrading landlines and faced with the prospects of my customers leaving and going all mobile,I think I would ma'be be  just a little hesitant. 



#48 MrBump

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 04:23 PM

Any subject of internet connections, do many people use satellite connections for their internet rather than hardwired?

 

We've used it before when we stayed in the middle of a valley near Skye, was quite good but we were having to leech off the connection from the farmhouse down the garden.



#49 George.

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 11:26 PM

 

 

There is also the little issue of Fax machines.. 

 

How many people use a fax machine now?

 

Not as many as previously, and whilst there are apps available to send/receive faxes via e-mail, not everyone has e-mail.

 

 

I wonder what sort of percentage of people now have no access to email?



#50 JustMe

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 03:55 AM

 

 

 

There is also the little issue of Fax machines.. 

 

How many people use a fax machine now?

 

Not as many as previously, and whilst there are apps available to send/receive faxes via e-mail, not everyone has e-mail.

 

 

I wonder what sort of percentage of people now have no access to email?

 

Well very few since it is perfectly possible to have an on-line life using public libraries without the need to even own a mobile phone or a tablet let alone a computer.  But at the same time there are certainly some older people who never became even mildly computer literate.