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Proposed new recycling scheme isles-wide


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#1 Suffererof1crankymofo

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 01:22 AM

Are they off their (rubbish) trolleys?

"There is a proposed four-week cycle whereby non-recyclable waste would be collected one week, paper and card in the second week, non-recyclable waste in the third week and then plastic, cans and cartons in the fourth week"

 

http://www.shetnews....ing-collections



#2 Colin

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 06:56 AM

Yes



#3 mikeyboy

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 07:41 AM

Sounds good.



#4 Colin

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 07:41 AM

The article raises a couple of points..

 

"An existing derogation allowing Shetland’s household waste to be incinerated at the Greenhead-based energy recovery plant will not be extended"

 

Is this the end of the Greenhead plant?

 

"a hypothetical recycling rate of 20 per cent would generate enough income to cut the cost of collecting waste by £25,000 a year from a current level of £1.17 million."

 

There's the 'h' word again..  Looks like someone has been busy modelling with a spreadsheet and, if I may say so, 25K as a percentage of 1.7M is so small as to be almost insignificant.  Easily swallowed up by a number of possibilities.

 

“Non-recyclable waste will be collected fortnightly from the usual collection location for each household.”

 

Does this mean that, eg; a chicken carcass has to be kept for up to a fortnight before it is collected?  Plenty of time to generate loads of flies I suppose..

 

"It also notes that “much of the content of a typical black refuse bag in Shetland is recyclable – but very difficult to separate form residual non-recyclable waste”.

 

OK, no problem (for me) here as I tend to separate waste at source..  Plastic into one carrier bag, tins into another etc.  At the moment, I place the whole lot into a single black bag.  Seems that now I am, perhaps, going  to be "forced" to buy/use extra bags.  Forget any idea of "waste containers".  Like a lot of other people, I have a number of steps up to the road and, I just don't fancy the idea of having to drag 2-4 weeks of rubbish in a huge plastic "bucket" up the steps.  Furthermore, I have little/no space to keep the "containers" either.

 

“Adopting this new collection model will make a sorting process viable and allow the SIC to access high-value recycling income streams,”

 

The needle on my "sprootle detector" is starting to tremble..  I wonder if the reports author factored in the cost (and other) implications of shipping the rubbish out?   Remember the plague of flies imported(?) with rubbish from Orkney?

 

"There is a proposed four-week cycle whereby non-recyclable waste would be collected one week, paper and card in the second week, non-recyclable waste in the third week and then plastic, cans and cartons in the fourth week."

 

OK, fairly easy to get my head around this..

"Non Recyclable" waste (food etc) would be collected fortnightly..  The other two categories would be collected monthly.. 

What are the odds on people getting confused as to just which category of rubbish is to be collected in which week?  Getting it wrong could mean household rubbish would accumulate quite dramatically.  Month old chicken rigs anyone?

 

"ZWS estimates that the quantity of waste recycled would rise from around 220 tonnes a year to somewhere between 1,150 and 1,750 tonnes."

 

Estimates?  Well, at least they have allowed 600 tons of "wiggle room".  I would wonder if they would hit the lower limit as, given the foregoing comments, a lot of paper/plastic might find itself re-classified as "garden waste" or "rayburn fodder" and get incinerated on site.

 

"the report also notes that the SIC is currently discussing the possibility of transferring responsibility for the energy recovery plant to Shetland Heat Energy and Power (SHEAP)."

 

Typical SIC.  Find something that might turn in a few bob, throw time effort and cash at it then, give it away... 

 

"“find and use waste streams that maintain sufficient calorific content”"

 

The needle on my "sprootle meter" is now "pegging".  Couldn't they have simply said "separate what burns from what doesn't"

 

“significant demand for places to take residual waste”

 

They will still have to find somewhere to store what's left over and, there are few/no places available..  Are the SIC going to start thowing stuff "over the banks" ? :mrgreen:



#5 George.

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 08:07 AM

Are the SIC going to start thowing stuff "over the banks" ? :mrgreen:

 

The S.I.C caused it all to be thrown over the banks two or three years ago when they stopped putting the skips out for everybody outside Lerwick.

 

And now they've had a great new idea?


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#6 Ghostrider

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 02:33 PM

What pin brain thought up that pile of bovne excrement, there's not even the beginnings of a good idea anywhere in it.

 

What happened to the much vaunted, but now suspiciously silent OIOF and their 'island proofing"? I guess it died as suddenly and along with Mr. Robinson's burgeoning political plans.



#7 Frances144

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 02:44 PM

Two weekly for food. Minging.

I do compost, but not meat.

#8 CrashBox

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 05:05 PM

So it'll probably mean using more black bin bags to separate all the different stuff. Hardly environmental, but definitely mental. I live alone and 'struggle' to fill a black bag on a weekly basis, but having lived with fortnightly collections down south, I wouldn't want to go back to that nonsense. 



#9 RileyBKing

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 05:41 PM

As I understand it, the main reason that weekly refuse collection services were established in the first place was to address concerns re public health posed by non-recyclable (i.e. food) waste. Writing fancy reports full of pc management speak changes nothing, but I guess we will have to find out the hard way first.



#10 Urabug

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 06:36 PM

Well the rats and the mice will be happy  :evil:



#11 Frances144

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 08:43 PM

Will they give us outlying regions (ie anywhere outwith the Big L) the wheelie bins to store the stinking bags?



#12 Ghostrider

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 09:33 PM

So, which week can you throw away your card cartons. The card week, the carton week, or both? :ponders:

 

Is there any sound practical reason(s) behind these dumbass proposals, or is it just Frau Sturgeon and more of her 'you vill ALL get viss de program' antics so she can tick a little box someplace while gazing longingly at any one of the dozens of portraits of Salmond that seem to litter wherever the SNP dwell.


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#13 Suffererof1crankymofo

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 06:58 PM

Will they give us outlying regions (ie anywhere outwith the Big L) the wheelie bins to store the stinking bags?

They will probably charge you at a discounted rate of £way too much for a wheelie bin or 'free' ... but when it's blown away a crazy amount to replace it.  Incidentally, I don't think they can actually force you to use certain coloured bins provided that your refuse is marked as to what type it is.  They tried to force wheelie bins on us in Newham and some of us looked at the legislation regarding rubbish collection and it was deemed that a black bag was 'a suitable receptacle'.


Edited by Suffererof1crankymofo, 23 August 2017 - 06:58 PM.


#14 Ghostrider

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 10:44 PM

I take it the SIC have never heard of split load rubbish trucks.

 

Many urban areas where this crap can sorta work, split loaders are the norm, approx 60% capacity takes the 'rubbish' rubbish every collection, and approx 40% capacity takes whatever recycable its the week for. Not perfect, but at least it means your crap doesn't stink any worse than it does now.

 

They buy new trucks regularly, just get split loaders next time round, and tell Scottie to whistle until that time comes.....unless of course they wanna buy them for them right now.



#15 Colin

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 06:51 AM

Maybe it's a "back door" way of introducing fortnightly rubbish collections....

 

Once the proposed scheme is introduced, how long before it is decided that plastics etc. only need to be collected once a month?


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#16 mogling

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 09:16 PM

Maybe it's a "back door" way of introducing fortnightly rubbish collections....

 

Once the proposed scheme is introduced, how long before it is decided that plastics etc. only need to be collected once a month?

 

I've been saying that for a while, that we can expect fortnightly rubbish collections-

did someone say that Orkney and Shetland were the only 2 local authorities

in the UK that still did weekly collections?

 

We'll need outdoor wheelie bins to keep out the smell

of 2 week old catfood sachets, unwashed tin cans etc

 

...maybe the SIC has done a deal with OIC to buy up its

'wheelie bin mountain'!



#17 Ghostrider

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 10:50 PM

The motivation behind this really boils down to being a paper exercise to tick boxes based on where lines are currently drawn in the sand, and not on practicalities or realities at all.

 

Reusing combustible materials as fuel, isn't concidered "true" recycling apparently, even though it saves having to create the carbon footprint of transporting and burning diesel to do the same job if you weren't burning the rubbish. So it shows up as a big black mark on their graph when it happens.

 

Instead, we're going to have to source alternate materials that can burn in the incinerator that was intended to take the rubbish, with whatever carbon foorprint that exercise generates, or close down the SHEAP outfit and revert back to all electic again and generate the diesel carbon footprint, whichever is the lesser. On top of that we're going to generate a further carbon footprint creating and distributing this £600k's worth of "recepticales" to make the new system work, and a further carbon footprint creating this £750k shed to sort, bale and store it all in, plus whatever machinery etc is required to do this, plus a further carbon footprint to transport it to wherever specialist facilities exist to process it, just so it can be turned in to something that's not furnance fuel, but is "true" recycling, and they get to tick a box someplace, never mind that the additional carbon footprint generated to do so very probably creates a significant nett loss of "greeness" overall compared to doing exactly what's being done already.

 

Someone should buy the twats who think this crap up a dictionary, recycling by definition is the reuse of material for another purpose once its current purpose is no longer required. Whats being proposed here is not recycling, its selective reprocessing, for no good reason at all as it makes the big picture worse, not better, but never let it be said that something as simple are reality should stand in the way of beaurcracy making thier stats and graphs look prettier.


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#18 Lerwick antiques

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 11:52 PM

All should get our fire places opened up again as most general rubbish can be burned in the fire. Anything that will be in the bin will be glass and tins/cans. Also get a warm house out of it to, now that's a way to benefit yourself and to reduce heating costs. 


Edited by Lerwick antiques, 24 August 2017 - 11:54 PM.


#19 Ghostrider

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 01:45 AM

^ Always did, until I got stuck in a council box that was all electric and had never had a lum. It certainly kept the heating bills down burning any old sh*t you could get your hands on in the Rayburn.

 

Although, the way things are going with emissions regs, its probably just a matter of time before there's some nosey beggar from the Council employed to go round sniffing everybody's reek to make sure they're not burning an "unauthorised" fuel in their fires......

 

This final line in that news story, what's this about....

 

".....new legislation comes into force banning biodegradable waste from going to landfill by 2021".

 

What am I not getting here? Biodegradable by definition returns to soil, so whats the problem with that. Banning non-biodegradable from landfill I could understand, bottles and some plastic would stay there almost forever virtually unchanged, but anything that becomes soil relatively quickly virtually vanishes harmlessly in to whats pretty much everywhere already anyway. what harm can burying tawtie peelins, taebags, an bits of mouldy bread do?



#20 Lerwick antiques

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 08:33 PM

If you have a garden then get one of those compost bins, which are fairly cheap for a standard one. That's where all your tea bags, bread crusts, old fruit etc go.

 

If you have a open fire place then burn all the other rubbish. If you don't have a open fire then you can buy garden incinerators £20 from Frank Williamsons.

 

Then that only leaves glass and metal cans/tins.