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Proposed new recycling scheme isles-wide


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#41 Ironwithin

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 09:50 AM

Reading the information am I right in thinking people are better to just put stuff that can be burned like paper etc in their general rubbish, as the district heating can then burn it, but can't if it is put to be recycled?

#42 Ghostrider

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 09:53 AM


This, is the "rubbish collection point" for this neighbourhood (Yes, for my sins I live in Horseshoe Close, what of it......). It serves 20 addresses...(plus numerous others from the wider district when they need crap out of their road before essy kert day - but we know nothing about anyone that ever does that)....and faces west, next stop Newfoundland, Canada - Check out the Grit bin lid for the consequences of that.

 

I await the full "instructions" as to how these new proposals will specifically work on this particular site.....I expect them to be "interesting".

 

12091399_976450922400868_237729949890425

 

Goodness, isn't the rubbish "Collection point" kept nice and tidy. The rubbish outside will probably be kept outside to let everybody know just what's inside. 

 

 

That pic is of one night's work by the local cat population. They'd managed to pull one bag down from the top of one of the bins....which aren't lidded as there's not enough room in that 'shed' for the lids to swing. Which they'd got to because despite it being reported more than once it took Housing over four months to patch up the doors which had blown off as they were muck rotten at the bottom hinges.


Edited by Ghostrider, 30 August 2017 - 09:56 AM.

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#43 George.

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 01:03 PM

Aren't Housing doing a good job.................. of keeping an unproductive job.


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#44 Ghostrider

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 07:31 PM

Aren't Housing doing a good job.................. of keeping an unproductive job.

 

The best. ;)


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#45 Ghostrider

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 03:13 PM

Reading the information am I right in thinking people are better to just put stuff that can be burned like paper etc in their general rubbish, as the district heating can then burn it, but can't if it is put to be recycled?

 

Yes. But you'll be sent to stand on the naughty step if the guys on the truck suss.

 

 

If the collection crews see the wrong material in the bin they'll leave you a note, highlighting what was wrong and how you can get it right for next time.



#46 Suffererof1crankymofo

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 05:58 AM

Right, let's break this down then:-

"From July 2018 how we handle our rubbish will be changing. There are a lot of questions around the new service. Here are the main questions:"

Oh good, it's their rubbish.

 

"Why is the Council doing this?

  • The Scottish Government has set the target of recycling 70% of all waste by 2025. In 2015/16 the national average was 44%, whilst Shetland was just 9%. Upcoming legislation will also mean that we will no longer be allowed to burn hard plastics and non-ferrous metals at the Energy Recovery Plant."

Define "upcoming legislation".  Is this legislation that has already been passed and is yet to come into force or proposed legislation?
 

"How will it be collected?

  • Households will have two green bins with different coloured lids and a reusable bag for recycling. The blue-lidded bin will be for card and paper. The grey-lidded bin will be for canscartons and plastic bottles. Put these bins at your usual collection point on the right day and it will be uplifted and returned to where you left it. The reusable bag will be for you to take glass to your nearest bring site. A full list of what is collected will be available soon."

So, I'm to drive down the road to dump my glass containers, am I?  That's not very green.  There isn't room for the wheelie bins here.  Where they meant to live in the meantime?

 

"How often will my rubbish and recycling be collected?

  • We will be collecting on a four week cycle. You will need to put out the correct bin on your usual collection day. If you put out anything else other than what is meant to be collected that week it will not be picked up. Example of collection cycle:
  • Week 1: Card & Paper (blue-lidded bin)
  • Week 2: Non-Recyclable
  • Week 3: Cans, Cartons & Plastics (grey-lidded bin)
  • Week 4: Non-Recyclable"

So there isn't a wheelie bin for non-recyclable rubbish?

Here's a thought - have ONE wheelie bin but issue different coloured rubbish bags free of charge.

 

"Why isn't glass being collected on the kerbside?

  • Glass is being collected separately to help prevent broken bottles/jars contaminating the rest of the recycling in your bins. Fill your reusable recycling bag and take it to one of the new bring sites whenever suits you."

So it's fine for the general public to run the risk of injury but not SIC workers in other words.

 

"Why is my rubbish only being collected once a fortnight?

  • We will still be collecting from every property once a week just picking up different things each visit. The more you recycle the less you'll put into the non-recyclable bin."

And where are we meant to put rubbish in the meantime?  Cloud cuckoo land?
 

"Why bother? I've heard you burn all the recycling anyway!

  • Legally anything we collect for recycling must be recycled. So everything you put into your recycling bins will be recycled."

Except rural areas under the Regulations are EXEMPT where it is not practicable or cost effective to do so.  You want "your" rubbish recycled, you can sort it and create jobs in the meantime ... or does the money given for this scheme not cover installing equipment that can sort it?
 

"What about the District Heating Scheme?

  • The District Heating Scheme will continue. Other fuel sources can provide a cheaper and more environmentally friendly alternative to burning diesel. So once all your recycling is removed the Scheme will have more than enough energy for its customers."

    That's not what they're saying, that's an assumption.

"Do I have to buy a wheelie bin for my non-recyclable rubbish?

  • No. We will collect the non-recyclable rubbish however you currently present it, so long as it is out at 7.30am on the correct day of collection. You will find that once you separate out your recycling what's left will reduce significantly."

    Nope.  I did this malarkey years ago.  Not everyone has space to store it.  What happens is you have several bags half full meaning you spend more money on bags, and you get confused as hell as to what is recyclable and what isn't.

"Is it only in Lerwick?

  • No. We are rolling out the new system across all of Shetland."

    Ah yes, "rolling".

"The bins will blow away!

  • There are many ways to secure wheelie bins, from bin stores to clamps/grips to bungee cord. During very bad weather all collections could be suspended and arranged for another day."

    The bin store isn't big enough!  Bad weather?  That'll be from September to April then. ;-)

"I don't have space for wheelie bins! I've got too many steps! I don't have a kerbside!

  • We will be assessing all routes to see what issues there might be and how they can be solved to let everyone recycle. If you have any specific issues please contact us."

    You should have done that FIRST.  Again, certain areas are EXEMPT under the Regulations.  I'm just trying to visualise the rubbish truck actually being able to reverse, what with all these wheelie bins and cables strewn about charging up the lekky cars.

"What if I put the wrong thing in the wrong bin?

  • Everyone makes mistakes. If the collection crews see the wrong material in the bin they'll leave you a note, highlighting what was wrong and how you can get it right for next time. Further advice and support will always be available should you need it."

    And how will they know the rubbish is mine?  How will they know that someone hasn't dumped rubbish in my bin?  What's the fine for non-compliance then?  You have a duty to promote but hey after all, it's YOUR rubbish, I merely gifted it to you.

"We will publicise further information and developments over the next few months. However, if you have any other questions on the new recycling scheme, please contact us:

  • email: recycling@shetland.gov.uk
  • tel: 01595 744810"

    Which councillor mentioned this in their manifesto?  Did any?  What's the point in contacting you, you will just patronise folk and won't listen.  This is about ticking boxes in order to meet EU legislation.  It's not green.  It's not saving the planet.

Edited by Suffererof1crankymofo, 01 September 2017 - 05:59 AM.

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#47 suuusssiiieee

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 12:39 PM

Correction to my post above so we get 2 bins each, i thought it was only 1 :o. So that means 12 bins (six flats) on the pavement from next summer + the 1 we have now.

 

They'll have to increase the width of the pavement at this rate as no sod will be able to walk on the damn thing for bins!



#48 Heranme

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 10:02 PM

And please don't forget during the winter months on the days when the pavements are covered in ice or/and snow, all these bins set out on the pavements blocking access for the small gritting tractors to carry out their essential works.

A lot of bins will be left out on pavements all year round, not everyone has space to accommodate them.


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#49 MrBump

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 06:32 PM

I must say when up on/in Shetland in Feb this year I was somewhat surprised that there wasn't a system like we have here. Felt somewhat bad or naughty putting paper into the general waste and it wasn't clear at all what if anything was recycled. I still don't understand why the glass has to be taken to a bottle bank? Very 80s/90s-esque, I remember my granddad lifting me to post the bottles into the bins as a kid. Also as mentioned  above it isnt very green if each resident drives to do this.

 

Here we have 4 bins...

 

Grey - Non-recyclable/general waste

Green - Food waste and garden waste if you pay for garden waste collection.

Blue - Paper, card etc.

Black - glass, cans/tins and plastic(which plastic does confuse me know)

 

Originally I remember it being a huge pain in the ass figuring out where to store the bins without making them stick out like a sore thumb, but most houses I see now have them in their front garden/drive for ease of use. 

 

2 bins are collected each week - Green and grey, then green and blue, then green and grey again, then finally green and black. Currently, our grey bin is 3/4 full or near full when it is time for the fortnightly collection, larger houses get larger grey bins. Blue is nearly always full for us for its monthly collection, whilst black with tins, glass etc we can do once every 8 weeks.

 

It's all well and good proposing it like the council have done but it seems really badly thought out given the terrain, costs of doing this over the most remote areas etc. Again this is from a non local, but as someone who loves Shetland and still wants to live there someday.

 

 

And please don't forget during the winter months on the days when the pavements are covered in ice or/and snow, all these bins set out on the pavements blocking access for the small gritting tractors to carry out their essential works.

A lot of bins will be left out on pavements all year round, not everyone has space to accommodate them.

 

We have people here near Manchester that are incapable of moving their bins even when they have space, but not sure if too lazy or daft to do so. My mum puts my nan's bins but not sure how other elderly/disabled get on with theirs.

 

People were very angry and annoyed when this was first brought in, but I guess a lot more recycling is done now that each house as the bins to do this. When we had an apartment in Manchester there were just huge communal bins. General waste, paper/card, Plastic/glass/tin bins and then the big dumpster bin trucks came and took them.

 

I applaud the idea for want to recycle more and be greener etc, but do it properly not half arsed like this seems.



#50 Ghostrider

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 08:46 PM

^ How far on average are plastics and card destined for 'recycling' on the mainland transported to reprocessing plants, and by what methods?

 

This pie-eyed scheme relies on sending it on a 200 miles ferry journey, plus onward freight to whatever reprocessing plant is accepting it. Its highly questionable if the value of the unprocessed plastics and paper so transported will cover the costs to deliver it there, never mind end up in a lesser carbon footprint than simply creating plastics and paper from virgin sources.

 

There's not even beginning to be anywhere near enough paper and plastic disposed of on isle to make local reprocessing a possibility, so shipping out is the sole option. Whenever recycling has been discussed previously the Council's stance has always been it wasn't economically viable to ship out anything for reprocessing, and that burning it in the incinerator was the most cost effectve and "greenest" option locally. So whats changed? Shipping hasn't gotten any cheaper, so has the price paid by reprocessors for unprocessed paper and plastics skyrocketed? I doubt it. If neither has appreciably changed, the question that needs answering is, was the Council lying to us then, or are they lying to us now, as their statements are polar opposites of each other, and cannot both be honest and factual.

 

Seems to me that this is a case of feed the plebs whatever b/s it is necessary to con them in to getting with the program, never mind that in actuality it will achive only a minute portion, if any, of the 'greeness' of the system its replacing. All because the SIC management team involved would rather sell their souls and look fools and idiots, than grow the balls to take on their Holyrood masters in a showdown and prove what an un-islandproofed piece of crap this all is.


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#51 JustMe

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 05:47 AM

I have a grey wheelie bin for general waste collected fortnightly.  Garden waste bin (grey with brown lid) collected on alternate weeks.  Food waste (green box), paper waste (blue box), Glass and cardboard ( green box but different to the food waste box) and tins + plastic bottles (brick coloured box) all collected weekly.  Council claims that the move to weekly collections has greatly increased the recycling rate.  Clothes, batteries and small electrical appliances are also collected.

 

There are two costs to shipping recycled materials south from Shetland.  The first is the monetary cost which is unavoidable especially as the rules on how much waste must be recycled get stricter.  The second cost is the carbon footprint and I am inclined to think that if space in otherwise empty containers is used that will be fairly minimal if the container and the ship are going south anyway.  Yes a touch of creative accounting but one I believe is right.


Edited by JustMe, 03 September 2017 - 05:47 AM.


#52 MrBump

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 09:27 AM

^ How far on average are plastics and card destined for 'recycling' on the mainland transported to reprocessing plants, and by what methods?

 

This pie-eyed scheme relies on sending it on a 200 miles ferry journey, plus onward freight to whatever reprocessing plant is accepting it. Its highly questionable if the value of the unprocessed plastics and paper so transported will cover the costs to deliver it there, never mind end up in a lesser carbon footprint than simply creating plastics and paper from virgin sources.

 

There's not even beginning to be anywhere near enough paper and plastic disposed of on isle to make local reprocessing a possibility, so shipping out is the sole option. Whenever recycling has been discussed previously the Council's stance has always been it wasn't economically viable to ship out anything for reprocessing, and that burning it in the incinerator was the most cost effectve and "greenest" option locally. So whats changed? Shipping hasn't gotten any cheaper, so has the price paid by reprocessors for unprocessed paper and plastics skyrocketed? I doubt it. If neither has appreciably changed, the question that needs answering is, was the Council lying to us then, or are they lying to us now, as their statements are polar opposites of each other, and cannot both be honest and factual.

 

Seems to me that this is a case of feed the plebs whatever b/s it is necessary to con them in to getting with the program, never mind that in actuality it will achive only a minute portion, if any, of the 'greeness' of the system its replacing. All because the SIC management team involved would rather sell their souls and look fools and idiots, than grow the balls to take on their Holyrood masters in a showdown and prove what an un-islandproofed piece of crap this all is.

 

If this was for me, then I honestly haven't a clue. I know there was a big paper mill/recycling place not that far away, but that is HUGE. I'd expect our paper to go there as its between 7-8 miles away. Not to mention our town is 110k people so lots more waste to perhaps make it worthwhile.

 

Now you mentioned it,  it does seem very ungreen with the distance covered and costly.  :ponders:


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#53 Ghostrider

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 12:15 PM

There are two costs to shipping recycled materials south from Shetland.  The first is the monetary cost which is unavoidable especially as the rules on how much waste must be recycled get stricter.  The second cost is the carbon footprint and I am inclined to think that if space in otherwise empty containers is used that will be fairly minimal if the container and the ship are going south anyway.  Yes a touch of creative accounting but one I believe is right.

 

Do you think that those self same regulations you refer to would allow "waste" to be shipped in random containers heading south? I would suspect, going by what we've been informed of them so far, such transfers will require dedicated containers, which will not only cost to ship out, but cost to ship back empty as well. I would be delighted to be proven wrong and your suggestion proven right, but.....



#54 JustMe

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 01:53 PM

 

There are two costs to shipping recycled materials south from Shetland.  The first is the monetary cost which is unavoidable especially as the rules on how much waste must be recycled get stricter.  The second cost is the carbon footprint and I am inclined to think that if space in otherwise empty containers is used that will be fairly minimal if the container and the ship are going south anyway.  Yes a touch of creative accounting but one I believe is right.

 

Do you think that those self same regulations you refer to would allow "waste" to be shipped in random containers heading south? I would suspect, going by what we've been informed of them so far, such transfers will require dedicated containers, which will not only cost to ship out, but cost to ship back empty as well. I would be delighted to be proven wrong and your suggestion proven right, but.....

 

Well I kind of assume that recycled materials could not be shipped in containers used for foodstuffs and so on but there have to be some containers that could be used for recycling heading south.  Or indeed not even containers.  Ships bring building products or coal one way could surely take what has to go for recycling the other way. 

 

Of course it would be good if some recycling could be processed in Shetland.  Like what happened to the idea of paper being turned into animal bedding?.



#55 Ghostrider

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 02:47 PM

Like the rest of us regular folk, you'e applying common sense. Regs come from Holyrood, Westminster and the EU, where common sense broke its neck at the first hurdle. Assuming anything where any of them are concerned is the best way to get it wrong.



#56 Frances144

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 03:25 PM

I wonder if Streamline will get their own boat again.

 



#57 Lerwick antiques

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 01:30 AM

What about the bins on commercial street and other bins for the general public?

 

How are the council planning to sort that out? have no public bins? have pairs of colour coded bins at various spots and hope the general public will put rubbish into the correct one? well it will probably get filled up with glass bottles at the weekend from the nightlife.

 

The council most be living on a different planet. Most folk that I know, especially the elderly, don't understand things like this. It's hard enough getting by day to day life without having to worry about what goes in what bin. Let alone expecting folk to put glass in a glass recycling bin. Maybe all fine and well with motorists but what about the folk that does not drive? and the elderly or disabled that does/can't go out much or can't walk any great distance?


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#58 Colin

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 07:49 AM

Saw an old fellow get on the Town Service with a couple of carrier bags full of glass etc. 

Got off at Tesco (presumably) to dump them in the bottle banks.

 

All well and good except, he left a trail of various liquids all over the bus/pavement/himself etc.  Go figure..

 

Can't imagine the bus companies being to pleased with being used as an essy cart if everyone starts doing this..



#59 mikeyboy

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 11:08 AM

^ How far on average are plastics and card destined for 'recycling' on the mainland transported to reprocessing plants, and by what methods?

 

This pie-eyed scheme relies on sending it on a 200 miles ferry journey, plus onward freight to whatever reprocessing plant is accepting it. Its highly questionable if the value of the unprocessed plastics and paper so transported will cover the costs to deliver it there, never mind end up in a lesser carbon footprint than simply creating plastics and paper from virgin sources.

 

There's not even beginning to be anywhere near enough paper and plastic disposed of on isle to make local reprocessing a possibility, so shipping out is the sole option. Whenever recycling has been discussed previously the Council's stance has always been it wasn't economically viable to ship out anything for reprocessing, and that burning it in the incinerator was the most cost effectve and "greenest" option locally. So whats changed? Shipping hasn't gotten any cheaper, so has the price paid by reprocessors for unprocessed paper and plastics skyrocketed? I doubt it. If neither has appreciably changed, the question that needs answering is, was the Council lying to us then, or are they lying to us now, as their statements are polar opposites of each other, and cannot both be honest and factual.

 

Seems to me that this is a case of feed the plebs whatever b/s it is necessary to con them in to getting with the program, never mind that in actuality it will achive only a minute portion, if any, of the 'greeness' of the system its replacing. All because the SIC management team involved would rather sell their souls and look fools and idiots, than grow the balls to take on their Holyrood masters in a showdown and prove what an un-islandproofed piece of crap this all is.

 

I think the plastics put for recycling were always shipped South. I remember somebody from the Council telling me at a Home show that they had a company who took it off them. This was when they were handing out the free coloured bin bags.



#60 mikeyboy

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 11:10 AM

What about the bins on commercial street and other bins for the general public?

 

How are the council planning to sort that out? have no public bins? have pairs of colour coded bins at various spots and hope the general public will put rubbish into the correct one? well it will probably get filled up with glass bottles at the weekend from the nightlife.

 

The council most be living on a different planet. Most folk that I know, especially the elderly, don't understand things like this. It's hard enough getting by day to day life without having to worry about what goes in what bin. Let alone expecting folk to put glass in a glass recycling bin. Maybe all fine and well with motorists but what about the folk that does not drive? and the elderly or disabled that does/can't go out much or can't walk any great distance?

 

 

And yet everywhere else somehow manages.

 

They are going to collect from the doorstep for exactly the reasons you state in your last point.