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holm clinker?


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#1 mogling

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 09:39 PM

The tea towel for sale on the Shetland Times website has all nautical terms /

words connected to the sea. I sent one to somebody who thought it great,

but wondered what a 'holm clinker' is... I dunna ken?

 

Onny ideas?  I'm thinking it's a peerie boat o some kind, like a punt?

 



#2 Ghostrider

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 12:28 AM

Somebody asked this self same question on another site, probably Facebook, not all that long ago, but I've forgotten who, exactly where, when, or what conclusion was eventually reached by contributors. So, basically I'm no help.....

 

A holm is well enough understood, a small grass topped stack or islet. Clinker the same, its the unburnable cinders among ash, but don't make any real sense to put together. Even allowing for it being something related to 'clinking' - spreading the end of a rivet to make it secure and tight, or a sharp/hard frost, or something that is impressive, new and shiny, its not really coming up with anything any better.



#3 Guest_Mr.Brown_*

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 01:26 PM

Since "clinker" can mean unburnable bits,like rocky bits in the ash (I didn't know that), then maybe holm clinker is something to do with the rock or fallen rock from a holm? Anybody out there with a Shetland dictionary?

#4 bug

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 05:38 PM

Only surmising, but given that we refer to small boats that are "Lapstrake built" as "Clinkers". i.e. Shetland models & punts etc.  it could be that a Holm Clinker is a small craft that you would not take too far out to sea, but would be ok for rowing/sailing to a holm where there is relative shelter and the boat is small enough to be taken to a shore where there is unlikely to be any good berths for bigger craft but would be easily accessible by a Clinker. Thoughts?



#5 mogling

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 08:48 PM

Thanks for your replies.

Bug- I was thinking of 'clinker-built' boats, and came to the same conclusion -

a peerie inshore boat. Forgot all about fire-clinkers!

 

I was thinking to get in touch wi Angus or Brian at the Archives,

or Ian at the Museum -  see if we can find out who designed

the tea towel?!

 



#6 bug

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 01:40 AM

Great minds think alike - and that trio will sort it :)



#7 Ghostrider

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 06:17 AM

I finally minded where on F/B I'd seen the same thing discussed.

 

The conclusion there was it must be a design fault, and they're meant to be read as seperate stand alone words, not together.

 

Nobody had ever heard it used, and nobody had a better explanation.



#8 mogling

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 03:51 PM

https://shop.shetlan...0&cat=51&page=1

 

Found the tea towel- if you enlarge the picture, holm clinker is on the left hand side-

{If you're a Luddite like me and have a desktop computer, you have to turn your head to the left

and get a stiff neck looking!}

 

Ghostie- that explanation sounds about right.

Mind you- they may well have invented a new useful phrase!

 

How about a "rig-clunker' - an MOT-failure isles car used purely on da croft for

taking bags of ewe nuts and peerie bales o hay doon tae meat da sheep :)


Edited by mogling, 23 December 2017 - 03:51 PM.