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Arming the police


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90 replies to this topic

#31 mikeyboy

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 07:52 AM

http://www.shetnews....ction-of-tasers

 

Looks like our police state is getting a bit closer..

 

Anyone else think that the police should not have access to any weapons that the rest of us can't have?

Not a great supporter of the police by any means but it looks like a sensible precaution to take. To have the training and the tasers available. But if used illegally I would expect to see prosecutions.



#32 George.

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 08:32 AM

 

http://www.shetnews....ction-of-tasers

 

Looks like our police state is getting a bit closer..

 

Anyone else think that the police should not have access to any weapons that the rest of us can't have?

Not a great supporter of the police by any means but it looks like a sensible precaution to take. To have the training and the tasers available. But if used illegally I would expect to see prosecutions.

 

And how many *solely legal* uses would you expect to be made aware of? Completly and utterly honestly by them, of course.


Edited by George., 10 June 2018 - 08:34 AM.


#33 mikeyboy

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 08:53 AM

What me personally George? I am not sure what kind of relationship you think I have with the police.

However every use of a taser is investigated by a supervisor and it's use has to be justified by the officer.

I think in a population of 20 odd thousand we would soon find out when one is used.



#34 wotsit

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 08:59 AM

Trouble is compared to South, police on Shetland are bored in most cases,and any excuse for bit of excitement is bit of a change for them “ the violence they generally experience on Shetland is nothing compared to what happens on a daily basis South. Any violence up here has been pretty mild going on any reports.

I cannot think of anything that has been reported in the paper in last few years that would warrant the police need to carry tasers.
Another toy to play with and use,points for the first officer to use one and try and justify it



Down South the police appear to try and do their upper most to smooth out situations and not make it worse, seem to use their people skills in calming situations and diffuse any rising tension. Up here they appear to be on a power trip, also look for that bit of excitement and certainly less friendly and unapproachable.
Down South, they smile and say good morning to you, up here your lucky to get a grunt.

Edited by wotsit, 10 June 2018 - 09:13 AM.


#35 mikeyboy

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 09:15 AM

http://www.shetnews....arty-pair-fined

 

 

Hmm I didn't have to look far.

This situation could easily have escalated out of control and is exactly the time when a cop saying I have a taser would calm things down a bit. Which it does in 80% of the occasions a taser is involved.

 

Not sure where you get your info on police tactics South from but in my past experience I don't remember many violent incidents being smoothed out. Unless of course they were drastically outnumbered.


Edited by mikeyboy, 10 June 2018 - 09:20 AM.


#36 wotsit

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 09:24 AM

How much of it is exaggerated and wound Up by the police link.


You put police officer in front drunken people end up with bigger problem, you put male / female nurses in similar situation 9 out. Of 10 you don’ t have a problem because they use their training and people skills and don’t have a chip on their shoulder.
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#37 wotsit

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 09:29 AM

What serious violence are you seeing .?

Down South tasers are probably needed Shetland is not Glasgow,London, Nottingham , serious violent crime daily basis which these officers could face at ANY TIME.

Few drunks from time to time on Shetland get rowdy , get real, that not serious crime. It is not even on a monthly basis.


Only serious crime up here is the way the council being run, unless your suggesting tasers are needed to keep the council in check.

Edited by wotsit, 10 June 2018 - 09:56 AM.


#38 mikeyboy

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 09:33 AM

Is that why A&Es need a police guard at the weekend?

 

You are contradicting yourself you have just told me that South the police use their people skills to smooth out situations and now you are saying you end up with a bigger problem.

 

I have no love for the police but I think it is sensible to have the training given and the weapon available if needed.

 

I heard a really interesting proposal on the Radio a couple of years ago. If you want to be a cop you first have to work in an A&E dept for a year. Learning first aid, people skills and importantly empathy. If you want to be a nurse you had to work with the police for a year. I guess learning self defence and how to handle yourself. Maybe a smidgin of law. Sounded not a bad idea.



#39 wotsit

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 09:43 AM

South police do use their people skills more for minor incidents like drunks, the tasers are used for serious violent crime which SHetland just doesn’t have and I was refering to police officers up here dealing with drunks inflaming situations for bit excitement.

Some big city hospitals may have police officers stationed at them but there not there to guard they are on hand if needed not necessarily for few drunks. They are there for other things that need investigating.
Eg domestic abuse,vulnerable adults, gang violence etc.

#40 mikeyboy

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 09:57 AM

South police do use their people skills more for minor incidents like drunks, the tasers are used for serious violent crime which SHetland just doesn’t have and I was refering to police officers up here dealing with drunks inflaming situations for bit excitement.

Some big city hospitals may have police officers stationed at them but there not there to guard they are on hand if needed not necessarily for few drunks. They are there for other things that need investigating.
Eg domestic abuse,vulnerable adults, gang violence etc.

 

What only at the weekend?

A spokeswoman for Unison, which represents 450,000 health workers in the UK, said: "We have spoken to staff working in A&E departments and some of them say it's like a war zone on Friday and Saturday night.

"here's no doubt the 24-hour drinking culture has meant that people are attending A&E drunk, particularly at the weekend.

"It's very frightening for staff working there and other patients.

"It's a sad fact that A&E need to have police officers in there to protect staff and patients."



#41 wotsit

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 10:14 AM

They are talking about big inner cities in your quote

The post is about arming the police ON Shetland with tasers.

We do not have serious violent crime on a regular basis, not daily, not weekly maybe not even monthly.

Just going to give Shetland police an excuse to escalate problem so they can use one, they are bored there no real excitement for police, here apart from a few rowdy drunks occasionally and I mean occasionally.

This is not crime drama Shetland.
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#42 George.

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 10:19 AM

A spokeswoman for Unison, which represents 450,000 health workers in the UK, said: "We have spoken to staff working in A&E departments and some of them say it's like a war zone on Friday and Saturday night.

 

A spokesperson for Unison who was told what to say, purely to justify a pay rise?



#43 mikeyboy

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 10:20 AM

Wotsit I am only replying to your points. 


 

A spokeswoman for Unison, which represents 450,000 health workers in the UK, said: "We have spoken to staff working in A&E departments and some of them say it's like a war zone on Friday and Saturday night.

 

A spokesperson for Unison who was told what to say, purely to justify a pay rise?

 

What are you talking about George?



#44 wotsit

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 10:22 AM

To be honest police on Shetland would do better arming themselves with more people skills, more manners and appearing more approachable and friendly, instead of trying to appear the opposite puffing themselves up and trying to look hard and on some sort of power trip. They are just not approachable.
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#45 mikeyboy

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 10:26 AM

To be honest police on Shetland would do better arming themselves with more people skills, more manners and appearing more approachable and friendly, instead of trying to appear the opposite puffing themselves up and trying to look hard and on some sort of power trip. They are just not approachable.

That is probably true. 

When I am spoken down to by an officer, I reply in a polite and calm manner and find that their manner changes.