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8 replies to this topic

#1 ll

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 10:18 PM

With three hostels in Lerwick sitting empty, could SIC look to generate some extra revenue by renting these out when not being used by students? Other areas appear to manage this. The cooncil are getting to have a large portfolio of empty buildings in da toon, might be good to try and use their brains to generate revenue instead of slapping the largest % rate rise on council tax again next year?
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#2 shetlander

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Posted 03 August 2018 - 06:55 AM

Would they generate income though when the council would need to employ staff to work over the holidays to check guests in/out, clean rooms etc? And how much at capacity are Islesburgh, the existing camping bods etc anyway?

I don’t know - just asking - but when hostel beds are usually flogged pretty cheaply I’d question whether it would make financial sense.

#3 ll

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Posted 03 August 2018 - 09:19 AM

Other areas seem to operate this type of thing profitably, would be good spin off to local businesses and facilities as well.

Sad thing is, SIC or it’s trusts have little incentive to make profits or have a good track record as far as business goes.

Could franchise it out for vacant periods if it was going to be worthwhile

#4 shetlander

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Posted 03 August 2018 - 10:59 PM

I just question how much of an unfulfilled demand there is here for hostel type accommodation that’d make it profitable or worthwhile for the council.

I’d imagine practically every ‘student bed’ in Edinburgh is occupied just now with the festival in full swing but we’re nowhere near there or most other Mainland destinations in terms of the volume of tourists/visitors looking for accommodation even in the height of summer.
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#5 MuckleJoannie

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 11:40 PM

The problem with Shetland is not always accommodation. There is a limited amount of ferries and planes for people to travel up here.


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#6 Rasmie

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 07:58 AM

There is a chicken and egg situation.

 

Cheaper travel is probably the main issue. The Scotgov subsidised Islander fares, which is fine for locals, does not encourage provision of cheaper flights for visitors. In fact it probably encourages the airline to keep the standard fares up, as Scotgov makes up the difference, but, for Islanders only.

However if travel became cheaper there probably wouldn't be enough accommodation. The boat is cheap enough, except for the cost of cabins, which makes it restrictive. I wouldn't travel without one.

 

In the past at least, the Education dept, has rightfully prioritised our children, but as such, have been very protective of their facilities, such as schools and hostels.



#7 ll

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 09:35 AM

Think we need some extra runs of the ferries that are lying idle in port for half their time. 

 

As long as the freight boat can move time critical products at normal sailing times, the passenger sailing could be increased. 

 

The Norrona could come and go within the hour with much more passengers and vehcles, whilst Northlink passenger vessels lie alongside for half a day and have about half a week in spare capacity in the summer where weather conditions are reasonable.

 

It's virtually impossible to make a return trip on the ferry now with car and cabin, when you want.

 

With added Streamline freight and increased demand due to the introduction of road equivalent tarriffs taking effect, things are going to get a lot worse.

 

Clearly significant scope exists to boost the Shetland economy with exisiting infrastructure?



#8 Wheelsup

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 03:16 PM

Do we actually a) need and B) want, any more visitors?

Who will benfit from more visitors?

Is there not a danger of ruining the place by filling it with any more crowds....



#9 Colin

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Posted 06 August 2018 - 08:01 AM

@wheelsup

 

Depends on the type of visitors.  Cruise ship passengers are, imho, of little or no benefit to businesses generally and only serve to inconvenience the general public.  Some businesses get a little out of them but, they are only here for a few hours so, nothing long term.  I;m not saying we don't want/need them as any kind of publicity is "good" publicity.  Just putting a perspective on them.

 

Shetland, generally, is not well set up for visitors of any kind and seems to be very "niche market" in the way it presents itself.  That would have to change in a way that "filters down" to everyone, and everyone would have to "smarten up" before we would all benefit.

 

To widen the market and make it more "inclusive" would probably "ruin" the place by dragging a lot of existing businesses and other facilities "kicking and screaming" into the 21st century and I think that would be "expensive".  Whether, or not, that would be "good" for the residents generally would remain to be seen.


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