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Level Playing Field (Fisheries Protection Agency statistics)


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26 replies to this topic

#1 Colin

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 09:29 PM

https://www.shetnews...at-inspections/

 

Is Duncan Simpson on to something ?

 

Looking at the figures in the article, it would appear so but, there's lies, damned lies, and statistics.

 

Wonder what excuses we will hear to justify the number of boardings ?



#2 George.

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 11:57 PM

Wonder what excuses we will hear to justify the number of boardings ?

It would be good not to be fed excuses. A little honesty would be a lot better.



#3 Ghostrider

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 02:53 AM

https://www.shetnews...at-inspections/

 

Is Duncan Simpson on to something ?

 

Looking at the figures in the article, it would appear so but, there's lies, damned lies, and statistics.

 

Wonder what excuses we will hear to justify the number of boardings ?

 

No doubt the higher percentage of UK vessels present in any one given patrol area within UK waters at any one time will get some blame, and while there may be an element of truth in that, at some times of year at least, they're going to have to milk it for all its worth to support most of those numbers.

 

What would be very interesting to know, which these figures can't show, is how many of the vessels recorded here were non-UK owned or operated, but UK flagged boats.



#4 Colin

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 08:14 AM

"What would be very interesting to know, which these figures can't show, is how many of the vessels recorded here were non-UK owned or operated, but UK flagged boats."

 

I guess there must have been some, and someone, somewhere will have the data.  Those figures should reduce(?) the quantity/percentage of UK owned and flagged vessels boarded.

 

I also wonder what the status of these vessels will be after we exit the EU ?



#5 Wheelsup

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 08:55 AM

Difficult to compare exactly, but my rusty maths suggests that it is in proportion. i guess they'll stop searching boats if the keep finding nothing.



#6 Wheelsup

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 11:57 AM

Interesting to note in the Norwegian newspaper Fiskbladet , a Shetland Boat recently landed fish in Ellingsoy, worth 100 Million Kroner (Over 9 Million Pounds.)



#7 whalsa

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Posted 22 November 2018 - 03:28 PM

Interesting to note in the Norwegian newspaper Fiskbladet , a Shetland Boat recently landed fish in Ellingsoy, worth 100 Million Kroner (Over 9 Million Pounds.)

 

This is interesting (and good on them!) but I am not sure what the relevance is to the discussion around Marine Scotland's enforcement methods?



#8 Colin

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Posted 22 November 2018 - 08:26 PM

 

Interesting to note in the Norwegian newspaper Fiskbladet , a Shetland Boat recently landed fish in Ellingsoy, worth 100 Million Kroner (Over 9 Million Pounds.)

 

This is interesting (and good on them!) but I am not sure what the relevance is to the discussion around Marine Scotland's enforcement methods?

 

Not relevant at all..

BUT

It does highlight the value of fish (presumably) caught in OUR waters.  I suppose that, without Marine Scotland, there would be a free for all.

 

Maybe highlighting the issue will go some way towards re-dressing any imbalance in boardings. 

I wonder if they board so many Scottish inshore vessels because they know that they (largely) play by the rules and don't really want to cause a row by boarding to many "johnny foreigner" types.


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#9 Ghostrider

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 01:34 AM

Interesting to note in the Norwegian newspaper Fiskbladet , a Shetland Boat recently landed fish in Ellingsoy, worth 100 Million Kroner (Over 9 Million Pounds.)

 

Which, were it not for us having to monkey around adhering to EU nonsense, might well have been landed in LK instead. With the benefits that would have brought to local employment and the local economy.

 

If the Norskie can pay that for fish, and still make a profit, the only reason we're not is that we're not accessing (or being allowed to access) the same portion of the world market as the Norskie is.

 

At least some of it comes back to Shetland via boat shareholder profit and turnover for the companies who sell supplies to the boat, but it could be so much more.


Edited by Ghostrider, 23 November 2018 - 01:36 AM.

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#10 George.

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 09:48 AM

I wonder if they board so many Scottish inshore vessels because they know that they (largely) play by the rules and don't really want to cause a row by boarding to many "johnny foreigner" types.

That suggests that Johnny Foreigner is being allowed to do what he wants to do. Yet another reason to go Indy - as if we need any more reasons.



#11 mikeyboy

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 02:46 PM

 

 

Interesting to note in the Norwegian newspaper Fiskbladet , a Shetland Boat recently landed fish in Ellingsoy, worth 100 Million Kroner (Over 9 Million Pounds.)

 

This is interesting (and good on them!) but I am not sure what the relevance is to the discussion around Marine Scotland's enforcement methods?

 

Not relevant at all..

BUT

It does highlight the value of fish (presumably) caught in OUR waters.  I suppose that, without Marine Scotland, there would be a free for all.

 

Maybe highlighting the issue will go some way towards re-dressing any imbalance in boardings. 

I wonder if they board so many Scottish inshore vessels because they know that they (largely) play by the rules and don't really want to cause a row by boarding to many "johnny foreigner" types.

 

 

 

Pretty big assumption that the fish was caught in UK waters. Ellingsoy is pretty far North up near Alesund so surely more likely that they were fishing in the Norwegian sea??



#12 mikeyboy

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 02:48 PM

The possible impact to fishing of a hard Brexit

 

https://www.wur.nl/u...exit MAGNET.pdf



#13 whalsa

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 06:08 PM

The possible impact to fishing of a hard Brexit

 

https://www.wur.nl/u...exit MAGNET.pdf

 

Interesting enough but irrelevant to this thread IMO. 

Also taking the Dutch conclusions with a pinch of salt. Economic forecasts are notoriously unreliable (plus I wouldn't be 100% sure there is no bias in there either).



#14 mikeyboy

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 06:18 PM

Well somebody brought the EU into the discussion, not sure on the relevance of that and you liked it. 

:roll:



#15 whalsa

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 06:54 PM

Well somebody brought the EU into the discussion, not sure on the relevance of that and you liked it. 

:roll:

 

Touche  :rofl:  Although that was a response to the original (semi) irrelevant post about a Shetland boat landing in Norway.