Jump to content

  • Log in with Twitter Log In with LinkedIn Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

With your Shetlink login details, all classifieds, private messages, and invoices are now accessed through the new Njord | Market system. Please see Njord | Market FAQ for more details.

Photo

Trump knitwear tariff


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Muckle Oxters

Muckle Oxters

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 179 posts

Posted 03 October 2019 - 06:12 AM

I see Trump is pittin a tariff on British knitwear amongst idder things. I wonder how dat’ll affect Shetland makers and da wider textile industry? https://www.theguard...irbus-subsidies

#2 Capeesh

Capeesh

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 424 posts

Posted 03 October 2019 - 07:41 PM

If only there was a way to multiply our clout through some sort of mutual trading association that could stand up for our interests.
Unbelievably there's people out there who think the USA and Trump will be our saviours after Brexit, if they're willing to do this against the biggest, wealthiest, and most powerful trading bloc in the world what'll happen when we leave it?

Edited by Capeesh, 03 October 2019 - 07:47 PM.


#3 Wheelsup

Wheelsup

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 448 posts

Posted 03 October 2019 - 07:45 PM

Just wait til we’ve left the union! (s)

#4 Ghostrider

Ghostrider

    1crankymofo

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9308 posts

Posted 03 October 2019 - 07:58 PM

Donald, whaur's dy lang ooin drawrs!



#5 Urabug

Urabug

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 904 posts

Posted 03 October 2019 - 10:49 PM

I see Trump is pittin a tariff on British knitwear amongst idder things. I wonder how dat’ll affect Shetland makers and da wider textile industry? https://www.theguard...irbus-subsidies

This is the price Scotland pays for Nicola and the SNP snubbing Donald on his visit to the UK, more than likely.

 

Our political leaders may not like or agree with each other but should respect one another for the greater good of there countries.

 

"Cutting off the nose to spite the face" may well cost jobs. 


  • Ironwithin likes this

#6 Colin

Colin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2264 posts

Posted 04 October 2019 - 06:28 AM

I'm no fan of "Krankie" and the SNP but, how can you pin this on her ?

 

Trump is just a "bully" and is throwing tarrifs around at will these days. 



#7 Windwalker

Windwalker

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 392 posts

Posted 04 October 2019 - 08:12 AM

It seem that Trump is trying to change what he sees as an unfair tariff arrangement, he believes that America is getting the short straw between them and the EU.  He’s doing this all over the world. The result will likely just be increased costs for everyone.

 

He has promised a great deal with the U.K. when/if they leave the EU, which may or may not re-address these tariffs. My concern is that I wouldn’t trust this man as far as I could throw him. He changes his mind on the turn of a button, and falls out with people like a primary school child, then seems to hold grudges. 
 

Of course if the U.K. leaves the EU, it can then agree these arrangements with all other countries including the EU. Whether Trump will stick to his promises, well your guess is as good as mine.  If Sturgeon has her way and Scotland votes to leave the U.K. and somehow manages to re-join the EU, then we are stuck with the tariffs they set/agree with the likes if America.

 

Things will only get more complicated whatever road we go down 



#8 Ironwithin

Ironwithin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 192 posts

Posted 04 October 2019 - 06:03 PM

The tariffs are on the EU, so if we were out they would not effect us.

#9 Capeesh

Capeesh

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 424 posts

Posted 04 October 2019 - 07:54 PM

The EU has, and always will have a much stronger hand than the UK alone in trade negotiations.
Anybody who thinks we'll get more favourable international trading arrangements than the ones the EU's negotiated on our behalf is in for a shock imho.

Edited by Capeesh, 04 October 2019 - 07:58 PM.


#10 Ghostrider

Ghostrider

    1crankymofo

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9308 posts

Posted 04 October 2019 - 09:01 PM

The EU has, and always will have a much stronger hand than the UK alone in trade negotiations.
Anybody who thinks we'll get more favourable international trading arrangements than the ones the EU's negotiated on our behalf is in for a shock imho.

 

Not quite that simple.

 

*If* the UK wishes to export something a foreign power needs/wants, that the UK is the main/only export supplier in the EU of (like fish!) , the UK on its own is in a strong position to negotiate a very favourable export trade. deal. Whereas, when the EU negotiates an export trade deal for the same product for the bloc they have no motivation nor clout to achieve anything but a mediocre to poor deal. That is the achillies heel of the EU.

 

Where the majority of members, or at least several of the strongest members of the bloc are contributing and consequently benefitting from exports from the EU as part of a trade deal, the motivation and clout is there to achieve a good result, where only one or two members are contributing to any one given products' export from the EU, there is none.

 

An EU which brokered/oversaw trade between members on favourable terms might have worked, that was the original idea behind the EEC, and while things were far from perfect under the stewardship of the EEC, they were tolerable. Its all this crap about members only being allowed to trade outwith the EU on Brussels' say say and terms thats made things intolerable.......and several other similar dictatorial edicts.


  • Ironwithin likes this

#11 Ironwithin

Ironwithin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 192 posts

Posted 05 October 2019 - 09:30 AM

Another problem with the EU and trade is that the current 28 countries have to agree so anything takes a ridiculous amount of time and there ends up with winner and loser countries in the EU. Countries dealing one to one is far quicker and can give more advantages to countries as you don’t have to lose out on say fish duty, due to a tariff wanted by someone else in the EU like turnip farmers in Belgium etc. The UK will do fine on trade out with the EU as it will be able to go after it’s own interests and not he hampered by 27 other countries wanting something else.
  • Suffererof1crankymofo likes this